Award Winning Vide-Oh: Ticket Without a Seat


This movie has won the Oscar for the best animated movie..It’s duration is only 3 min…. See how life can change when our perception changes. An outstanding movie!!!

This short animated feature is engaging and poignant. It has a life lesson about preception and reality!

 

More Vide – Ohs

To See additional Interesting Videos Click HERE


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All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged #please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross 2014 – 2020 – JBRish.com



Photography: My Shot – Beautiful Hillside in Sintra, Portugal

 

Whether I am traveling to foreign countries or hiking the national parks, one of my major goals is to capture the experience through my photography. Of course weather is not controllable and under adverse weather conditions, photography can be challenging.

When traveling with a tour group another “tricky” variable is how much time will be allotted at a given site and what areas will be available to view before needing to get back to the group.

In the picture below, I was with a group touring the National Palace in Sintra, Portugal. It is just a short ride from Lisbon via bus. The town is historic with very narrow streets and many pretty houses.

While we were touring the various rooms of the Palace, windows were open to allow air to circulate through the building. One procedure I have developed as a photography enthusiast is to look for pictures within pictures. When I looked through a palace window, I saw the scene pictured below.

Although the sky was cloudy and the light was not great, I thought it was remarkably picturesque. The details and colors of the buildings juxtaposed against the lush foliage certainly caught my eye. While my movement was limited because of the narrow window I thought the composition was also worthy.

I hope you concur that this is an interesting picture taken on a cloudy day.




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Metadata

File Name: 0000350 Picturesque view of the mountainside of Sintra Portugal 2622r.jpg
Capture time: 9:17 AM
Capture date: May 10, 2018
Exposure: 1/125 sec @ f/9.0
Focal Length: 55mm
ISO: 100
Camera: Nikon D3300
Lens: 18.0 – 55.12mm f/3.5-5.6
Edited in Lightroom

Photography: This I Learned is True

“I guess I’m trying to say, grab anything that goes by.
It may not come around again.”

— John Steinbeck —

 

I am not a professional photographer. I am a hobbyist. I enjoy beautiful photography and the beauty to be found in the “vision” of others. We can all visualize the same vista, but the gifted photographer can find the ultimate beauty in the scene. This is very difficult. Having said that by way of introduction, this post is about something quite different.

Most of my photography is of the landscape or scenery genre. What this means is that we often spend a full day hiking in remote locations to see things that many will never see. My joy and pleasure is to capture a photograph that will, in some way, bring that beauty to those who view the photograph.

Here is the truth that I have learned by being a photography enthusiast. If you have a camera with you and you enjoy photography. When you come across a scene that calls to you, stop everything and take the picture.

There have been many times in my past that I said to myself: “I don’t want to stop now. I will take that picture on the return trip.” It may be a variation of this theme, but it has happened a significant number of times.

This is the truth that I have learned. Most of the time that scene will not be there when you return. The clouds will move, the light will change, your mood will change, your vision may be altered and the picture you envisioned will remain a vague memory.

Having regrets is a terrible thing and I have a good number of photography regrets of pictures I wished I had taken when I had the opportunity. When the vision appears – when the moment strikes you – stop what you are doing and take the picture. Even if it turns out to be a disappointing capture, you will reduce the number of regrets you have for those photos that might have been. There is little or no downside to this. You will have some very good memories and a perhaps a few remarkable pictures because they encase your vision; your idea of beauty.


Case in Point

We visited Yellowstone National Park. This was a bucket list trip for us and we hiked all day every day. There was no time to waste and no time to be tired. We waited for this a long time so no matter what, we awoke early and went on our way!

When we arrived at the Mammoth Springs area of Yellowstone, we were only five miles from Gardiner, MT. We knew from others that there was a great pizza place there and a variety of stores: supermarkets, hardware stores, pharmacies, etc.

After a day at this location, we received a warning from our car that the battery in our fob needed replacement. Our Subaru has no manual override for starting and we had fears of being stranded in this remote location without a way to start the car. It is the fob or nothing. Obviously this made us a bit nervous so we took one afternoon off to headed to Gardiner.

Just as we were leaving the park with Gardiner in plain view a few blocks away, we came upon the Roosevelt Arch. This is a wonderful tribute to Theodore Roosevelt who was a national park visionary. I was worried about finding a replacement battery for my fob and I really was anxious to see which vendors in town might have it. I was very focused on that issue.

On the other hand, the cloud pattern was interesting and the sky was blue. I forced myself to pull over to take a picture of the arch. There were people standing in the way, but I waited. I cannot claim that I wasn’t distracted, but I didn’t want to miss this opportunity.



Although I would not declare this is a great picture or one of my best photographs, it has been very popular on various websites. More than anything else…it has helped me avoid another photography-related regret.

To summarize my photography truth , don’t wait to take a picture. Carpe diem when the moment strikes! There is a reason a scene resonates with you. Don’t wait. Take the picture and avoid the regret of what might have been.


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Metadata
Capture time: 12:21 PM
Capture date: Sept. 13, 2018
Exposure: 1/640 sec @ f/9.0
Focal Length: 18mm
ISO: 200
Camera: Fuji X-T2
Lens: XF18-55mm, F2.8-4 R LM OIS
Edited in Lightroom

See more photography posts HERE and visit Jeff’s Instagram site HERE


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All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross 2014 – 2020



Gardening When It Is Hot, Hot, Hot

Living in the Valley of the Sun when temperatures in April can reach 100 degrees and by May 100 seems as though it is a daily occurence, gardening still goes on. To deal with the unusual heat and direct brutal sun, however, certain accommodations must be made.

Because of the unusual emergency situation in the US this year, we were late in getting to some of our planting. One family of plants that is reliable even in the heat and sun of Phoenix, AZ are gazanias.

While gazanias can be grown everywhere, they do very well in hot weather. After all, they are native to South Africa. In areas that receive cold weather, these would be annuals. In the desert, they can be weathered over, but to be honest, they get bedraggled after one year and need much pruning and tender care to keep them going.

We find it more beneficial to introduce new plants each year.

I have written about them HERE and HERE

When planting even these hardy sun-loving plants, the gardener can’t just place them in their pot or garden space with appropriate fertilizer and water and anticipate that they are going to adjust and adapt easily.

What we have found that works well, is to provide a covering or some shade for two or three days and then remove the covering towards the evening of the last covered day when sun is no longer on them so they are prepared for the next day.

Here is what it looks like in our garden when we plant during the heat of the season!



The picture above is of a newly planted gazania. We use rock mulch to hold the emitters in place and help keep the lower layers of soil damp.



This is the same plant with its “hat” on. Notice that there is some light that gets to the plant, but not extreme sun. These simple baskets can be found at stores that sell things for a dollar (+/-). Of course there are more expensive coverings as well. We have a plastic milk crate we sometimes call into action for larger planters.

NOTE: If wind is going to be an issue, place a rock or other weight on top, making sure the covering is not crushing the plant.



We also use shade cloth when necessary because it is the only available covering at the time or the pot is large. We hold the covering above the plant by inserting bamboo garden stakes and using medium stationery clips to affix the cloth to the stakes; strong twist ties would do as well.

Gazanias are striking plants with exquisite color variations. They are very forgiving and I recommend them. The flower to leaf ratio is generous so there is much color in the area when they are cultivated.

Read more about gazanias.

How To Grow Gazania Treasure Flowers: Care Of Gazania Flowers


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All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross 2014 – 2020 – JBRish.com



Photography: My Shot – Amazing Formations @ Cathedral Gorge

National Parks receive much earned praise and attention, but there are many state parks which provide unique experiences every bit as exciting in their own right.

One such treasure is Cathedral Gorge State Park in Nevada. Erosion over time has created sculptured columns of soft bentonite clay that form arrays of spires in brownish, orange and contrasting lighter colors.

The towering cones cluster together forming alleyways and maze-like areas which, in our experience, lead to dead ends sooner or later. They are fun to explore. Some “rooms” had abundant groupings of tumbleweed.



The photo above shows one section of spires which beckons hikers to come and explore. The clay is very soft and quite susceptible to erosion. Notice the “window” forming at the top-right of the central arc.

Cathedral Gorge
111 Cathedral Gorge State Park Road
Panaca, NV 89042

Read more HERE

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Metadata

File Name: DSC_4464.NEF
Capture time: 9:29:35 AM
Capture date: June 13, 2019
Exposure: 1/125 sec @ f/10
Focal Length: 48mm
ISO: 100
Camera: Nikon D3300
Lens: 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6

Edited in Lightroom

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Check out Jeff’s Instagram account for more interesting photos!

Read more photography posts HERE


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All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged #please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross 2014 – 2019 JBRish.com



Photography: My Shot – The Serendipity of Art

I presume most of us are familiar with the expression “Beauty is in the Eyes of the Beholder” and that is quite true. Personal taste or recent life events may color a person’s perception and one individual may view something very differently than the next person.

As a photography enthusiast, I have learned to look at the little things and the everyday objects for beauty that often lurks under our noses and yet goes undetected. A few years ago on a trip to Japan, I “discovered” this item which I found immensely appealing.


The area was crowded and I had to wait to take the picture to avoid other people entering the frame. I edited some of the surrounding area that might have been distracting to enable the viewers to appreciate the delicate and well-balanced beauty of this artwork.

I am sure many of you know what the item in the picture is. Why not leave a comment a) with your suggestion of what the item in the photograph might be, or b) about the piece itself?

Another quote about the perception of art and/or beauty:

“The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes but in having new eyes.” – Marcel Proust

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Metadata

File Name: Japan_IMG_2598a.tif
Capture time:
Capture date: July 24 2015
Exposure: 1/250 sec @ f/6.3
Focal Length: 5.8mm
ISO: 100
Camera: Canon PowerShot SX50 HS
Lens: 5.8-23.2

Edited in Lightroom & Photoshop

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Check out Jeff’s Instagram account for more interesting photos!

Read more photography posts HERE


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All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged #please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross 2014 – 2019 JBRish.com



Nature’s Color Bounty on Display at Glacier NP

We spent a week hiking at Glacier National Park, Montana which is one of the most remote national parks in the United States. As the glaciers release the waters frozen in their winter larder, the streams and waterfalls flow freely. Although the sun was not dominating the sky on this day, the colors rendered all around us were magnificent.

While hiking along the Johns Lake Loop, we came across a number of vistas similar to the one below which was remarkable in the natural beauty rendered.



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Metadata

File Name: 000053_XT2A2321_glacier-HDR.dng
Capture time: 11:59:32 AM
Capture date: July 12, 2019
Exposure: 1/45 sec @ f/20
Focal Length: 18mm
ISO: 400
Camera: Fuji X-T2
Lens: XF18-55mm F2.8-4 R LM Ois
Edited in Lightroom

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See more photography posts HERE and visit Jeff’s Instagram site HERE


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All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross 2014 – 2019 – JBRish.com



Desert Garden Ablaze with Color

The desert has been ablaze with color over the last two weeks reaching its peak perhaps just a few days ago. It is still stunning in the variety of colors and blooms brought on by more than the customary amount of spring rains thus far.

The Palo Verdes are always a treat, but this year they have outdone themselves.

The contrast of the yellow flowers against the blue sky is wonderful.



Here is a close up of the flower clusters on one portion of a branch in our backyard.



The color palette is expanded below when the Palo Verde in the foreground leads the viewer to the flowers of the Orange Jubilee or Orange Bells hybrid (Tecoma Hybrid).



Naturally a closeup of the Orange Bells is called for as well. The clusters are beyond vibrant in the early morning sun.



Each morning at this time of the year, I prepare my coffee looking out our family room window and I am blown away! (To the right and north of the saguaro, but out of view, is Black Mountain which adds even more wonderment to the scene.)



We have some performers starring in our front landscape too. This cactus was started from a cutting just a few years ago and when it blooms, it puts on quite a show. It will eventually grow arms and as a mature plant, may have a dozen or more flowers open at once. I can’t wait! While I am not able to make an absolute identification, I am fairly sure it is a Trichocereus hybrid.





Here is a picture of the mature mother plant from a friend’s house nearby!


Above picture courtesy of L. Herring


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All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross 2014 – 2019 – JBRish.com



Adventures in Oregon: Newport to Yachats


Yaquina Head Lightouhse
Yaquina Head Lighthouse ,Newport, OR

Lighthouses have often had a romantic and storied aura about them and they remain just as alluring today as they have in our nation’s past. Although numerous lighthouses are no longer in use, they still draw visitors to the edge of the oceans and nearby cliffs.


Yaquina Head Lightouhse

The Yaquina Head Lighthouse is located north of Newport, at Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area. If you are a photographer, plan to stop several times during the approach to the main parking lot as the views are excellent from a variety of vantage points.


Yaquina Head Lightouhse

If the day is busy, it will be a challenge to take photos without numbers of tourists in and around the lighthouse, but careful framing can keep the focus on the lighthouse itself.


Ocean views provide their own beauty!
Ocean views provide their own beauty!

The lighthouse isn’t the only photo-worthy subject as the ocean cliffs and rock formations against the grassy bluffs provide another form of beauty!

Just a short 20-plus minutes south brought us to another noted stop, Seal Rock. It was a pretty ocean front park with several magnificent rock formations. We didn’t see any seals this day, but the sunlight was most welcome.


Seal Rock - Sunrise
Seal Rock Recreation Site with the morning sun breaking through


Sunrise at Seal Rock

While the seals were not present this morning…


Sunrise at Seal Rock

the Cormorants and Seagulls were enjoying the warmth of the sun!


Sunrise at Seal Rock

I enjoy unique and different buildings and Yachats had a historic church that was hewn from local timbers erected in the shape of a cross in 1930. The church was not open for visitors when we arrived, but I took a photograph to record the stop.


Little Log Church

Just north of the Cape Perpetua Visitor’s Center, we stopped to investigate the Devil’s Churn. With a name like that, who could resist? This inlet is noted for the rushing, churning waters.


The Devil's Churn

One area that we found worthy of longer exploration was Cape Perpetua.


The power of the Pacific at Cape Perpetua
The Power of the Pacific could be felt at Cape Perpetua

There were numerous tide pools and basins for the curious!


Ocean basin and tide pools to explore

One intriguing, highly touted attraction was Thor’s Well (below). The depression is best seen during higher tides, but was interesting enough for us as water gushed up from beneath the hole in the rocky formation. At higher tides, the water spills into the hole creating an interesting visual effect – see photos HERE.


The Devil's Punchbowl at Cape Perpetua

We also spent time exploring the tide pools and enjoying the beautiful creatures that live within. These anemones were a deep emerald green color!


A closeup of the anemones in a nearby tide pool

It was time to check our itinerary and head to our next stop; the Heceta Head Lighthouse.


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Read previous posts about our adventures hiking and exploring in Oregon:

Exploring Astoria, Oregon – Part 1

Exploring Astoria, Oregon – Part 2

Exploring Astoria, Oregon – Part 3

Adventures in Oregon: Warrenton to Seaside

Adventures in Oregon: Hiking at Indian Beach

Adventures in Oregon: Views from Ecola Point

Adventures in Oregon: Movin’ On Down the Road

Adventures in Oregon: Garibaldi’s Graces and Pier

Adventures in Oregon: Tillamook – Cape Meares Lighthouse

Adventures in Oregon: Pacific City, Neskowin & Lincoln City

Adventures in Oregon: Cascade Head and Hart’s Cove in Lincoln City

Adventures in Oregon: Cape Foulweather & Drift Creek Falls

 

Read more Hiking and Exploration posts HERE


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All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross – 2018 – JBRish.com



Vide-Ohs: Dust in the Blood (Hiking the Grand Canyon)

JBRish readers know that one thing we enjoy and write about on this blog is hiking and exploring natural places. We appreciate all forms of wildlife and types of terrain, but the mountains and canyons have a special pull on our adventurous spirit.

The Grand Canyon is indeed one of earth’s treasures and it is a shame that mankind has tried to take advantage of its bounty by harvesting natural resources and obliterating some of the pristine beauty.

Below is just one photograph I took on our visit to the North Rim. It was taken with a very simple point-and-shoot camera with only 8 megapixels of resolution when most of today’s cameras start at twice that number and many go to three or four times that and beyond.


North rim of the Grand Canyon near the Lodge

Even with the limited ability of the camera and the photographer, I think you will agree that this is a pretty, colorful picture taken near “the Lodge” at the north rim of the Grand Canyon.

I am also sharing the trailer to the movie Dust in the Blood detailing the journey of filmmaker/photographer Pete McBride and writer Kevin Fedark as they try to hike the 750 mile length of the Grand Canyon.

Dust in the Blood – Trailer from Pete McBride on Vimeo.

From the Vimeo web page hosting the trailer:

In 2016 filmmaker/photographer Pete McBride and writer Kevin Fedarko set out on a 750-mile journey on foot through the entire length of the Grand Canyon. From the outset, the challenge was far more than they bargained for. More people have stood on the moon than have completed a continuous through hike of the Canyon. McBride and Fedarko took a sectional approach, achieving a feat that many adventurers have taken decades to complete. Others have lost their lives trying. But their quest was more than just an endurance test – it was also a way to draw attention to the unprecedented threats facing one of our most revered landscapes.

Throughout their passage, McBride and Fedarko encountered an astonishingly diverse and powerful landscape, rich in history, that is now facing perhaps the gravest crisis in the 98-year history of the Grand Canyon National Park.

Directed by Pete McBride and produced by the award-winning team at Insignia Films, THE CANYON is a story of extreme physical hardship that stretches the bonds of friendship and a meditation on the timeless beauty of this sacred place. It is an urgent warning about the environmental dangers that are placing one of America’s greatest monuments in peril and a cautionary tale for our complex relationship with the natural world.

 

More Vide – Ohs

To See additional Interesting Videos, click HERE


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All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross – 2018 – JBRish.com