A Baseball Incident to Remember: Yogi Berra

I am not necessarily a strong believer in fate, but I have to admit that every so often there is an event that makes me wonder if the universe has not conspired to bring all the factors into alignment at a given moment.


Yogi Berra at age 90
picture courtesy of https://www.ksdk.com/

I grew up in NYC and like many, I was a NY Yankee fan. I saw many ball games at Yankee Stadium during those halcyon years. Mickey Mantle, Whitey Ford and Yogi Berra were among my heroes.

I just finished reading a book that I can recommend for anyone who loves baseball, the NY Yankees or Yogi Berra. My Dad Yogi by Dale Berra is entertaining and insightful. The focus is on Yogi Berra; a talented ball player and all around excellent human being. There are other family stories as well and fans will be more than happy with the book.

There is one incident in the book, however which I found fascinating. Here is a summary.

Background Information – “George Steinbrenner fired Yogi after just 16 games of the 1985 season when he previously said that Yogi would have his job as manager all season. Yogi Berra, No. 8, said he would not come back to the Stadium as long as Steinbrenner ran the team. He has not come back. He said yesterday he would not be at the first game of this Series, any of the games. The Series thus misses an honored guest. [ed]”

You can read more about the incident HERE

Yogi did not return to Yankee Stadium or have anything to do with the team for the next 14 years. He felt that Steinbrenner owed him an apology and would not consider being part of Yankee baseball until he received one.

Joe DiMaggio, on his death bed, convinced George Steinbrenner to make up with Yogi. When the Yogi Berra Museum was opened, Steinbrenner took the opportunity to mend fences and Yogi Berra agreed!

Now for the unbelievable “coincidence” (Based on the book by Dale Berra)…

  • On July 18,1999 – Yogi Berra Day – A Ferry named the Yogi Berra was re-routed from Weehawken NJ to NYC – to the Harlem River to make it easy to get to Yankee Stadium.
  • Joe Torres was Yankee Manager.
  • Don Larson (the only pitcher to throw a perfect game in a World Series – 1956), threw out the first pitch that day to Yogi Berra who was the catcher during that perfect game!
  • When Joe Torres was 16, he managed to get a ticket to watch Don Larson pitch his perfect game to Yogi during game 5 in the 1956 World Series.
  • Unbelievably, David Cone pitched a perfect game on this very special day AND to top it off, it was Joe Torre’s birthday.


David Cone's perfect game
picture courtesy of https://www.forbes.com/

As NY Yankee announcer Mel Allen might have said: “How about that!?”

A Soldier’s Son – US Troops in Hawaii (1934 +/-)

“The soldier is the Army. No army is better than its soldiers. The Soldier is also a citizen. In fact, the highest obligation and privilege of citizenship is that of bearing arms for one’s country.” — George S. Patton

NOTE: You can read the introduction to this series HERE:


***************

When I was a teenager, I heard my father talk about being stationed at Schofield Barracks in Hawaii. Among his photos were a number of pictures taken in Hawaii including those of celebrities and his buddies at work and play.

FDR visited Hawaii in 1934 and I believe the photograph below was taken during that trip. One of his sons sits next to him in the car.


FDR and his son (Probably Franklin Delano Roosevelt Jr.) visit Hawaii - 1934
FDR and his son (Probably Franklin Delano Roosevelt Jr.) visit Hawaii – 1934

size – 4.5 x 2.75 square including white space


NOTE – While there was no annotation on this photograph, there are similar pictures in the historical archives such as this one linked below.
https://www.gettyimages.dk/detail/news-photo/welcoming-of-the-president-franklin-roosevelt-and-his-son-news-photo/107424161

Presidents aren’t the only noteworthy visitors to meet and greet America’s troops. Young Shirley Temple also visited soldiers in Hawaii.


Young Shirley Temple visits American soldiers in Hawaii
Young Shirley Temple visits American soldiers in Hawaii
size – 4 x 2.8 including white space

While this cannot be verified, my assumption is this photograph of Shirley Temple with a glass of soda was taken during that same trip. The photograph was sitting alongside the others.


Shirley
Shirley Temple with a glass of soda and what appears to be a puppy
size – 4.5 x 2.75 including white space

Also bundled with the photographs above, was this picture which I am also “guessing” is of actress Sonja Henie who was with Shirley Temple during her visit to Hawaii. Any information to correct the record would be appreciated.


Sonja Henie visiting Hawaii with Shirley Temple

Sonja Henie visiting Hawaii with Shirley Temple.
size – 2.75 x 4.5 including white space

NOTE – This page (link below) contains a different photograph of Sonja Henie with Shirley Temple –
http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?/topic/246539-pineapple-army-the-wolfhound-pack-27th-infantry-regt-schofield-barracks-th/

 

NOTE — All photographs are “for sale.” Anyone interested in purchasing photographs should contact me via the JBRish.com contact email, i.e. JBRish [dot]com [at] gmail[dot]]com

 
DISCLAIMER — Many of the photographs I will be presenting as part of this series are very small and/or very old. In order to enable proper viewing, I scan the images and enhance them to the extent possible using Adobe Lightroom or Photoshop software. These images are not manipulated to remove or modify the content. The enhancements are strictly to provide contrast, bring out details and to render black and white areas in more natural tones. Nothing has been removed or added. I will provide approximate measurements of the actual photographs as they may seem larger than actual size because of the digital presentation.


**********

 

All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross 2014 – 2019 – JBRish.com


Commit, Motivate, Succeed!


action precedes motivation

If you are a regular reader of JBRish, you know that I collect and enjoy good quotes. I have been a quote collector for more than fifty years. When I was in teaching, I used quotes to stimulate dialogue at the beginning of my lessons.

I am always searching for that next best quote whether it be from an ancient pundit like Plato, a well-known author like Mark Twain or just someone who managed to capture an idea in a way that I found stimulating, poignant or motivational.

I recently discovered Benjamin Hardy’s post, These 20 Pictures Will Teach You More Than Reading 100 Books, mainly because it had potential to be a source for a few good quotes. Much of the time an article like this will have a few good quotes indented and set off to help make a point, but this study captured me. While looking at some of the quotes, I began to read the supporting exposition and I was hooked!


Behavior drives motivation.

If you want to understand the psychological underpinnings of how you (and anyone else) can accomplish their goals, I believe this article will start you on your way. I dare say, it might be one that you will refer to over and over. A major hypothesis is that you can’t wait for inspiration. You need to create it through your actions.

Hardy uses an example of some perceived music greats to make a point:

For example, among the 50 greatest pieces of music ever created, six belong to Mozart, five are Beethoven’s, and three Bach’s. But in order to create those, Mozart wrote over 600 songs, Beethoven 650, and Bach over 1,000.**

I find this to be very true. As humans, I think we are conditioned to focus on the great achievements, casting aside all of the failures and hard work it took to get the final point of success. As Robin S. Sharma points out, “Every master was once a beginner.” Likewise, we often focus more on our few failures than our many interim successes.

Another factoid from the article that I found fascinating follows:

In 2005, the National Science Foundation published an article showing that the average person has between 12,000 and 60,000 thoughts per day. Of those, 80% are negative and 95% are exactly the same repetitive thoughts as the day before.**

That is a multitude of brain power delivering all those thoughts. We then should ask: What happens to all those thoughts? Why are we having the same thoughts day after day? In the article Benjamin Hardy explains what is happening and how it might apply to you.

If you are a creative person and you want to be motivated and inspired, I highly recommend this reading. I think you will be glad that you did!


You make or break your life before 8am

** The pictures and quotes are printed here courtesy of the original article linked above!

Read more miscellaneous stories on JBRish HERE


**********

All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross – 2018 – JBRish.com



A Sports Legacy for North Phoenix


Legacy Sports Arena Opening Sign

New ground has recently been broken in North Phoenix, both figuratively and literally. Just a short distance from the intersection of I-17 and Route 303, construction of the Legacy Sports Arena has begun as part of the Gateway Community.


Legacy groundbreaking ceremony

Cave Creek resident Robert Eaton and his team are working hard to complete an ambitious and profoundly different sports facility with an anticipated opening scheduled for the Fall of 2020. The plans call for two NHL-sized hockey rinks with the latest LED technology employed via glass flooring that can provide lighted boundary lines for basketball courts, dodgeball, soccer, lacrosse and for the fastest growing sport in the United States and Canada…a dozen pickleball courts!


Construction starting at the Legacy Sports Complex

As Rob pointed out during the groundbreaking ceremony, the name Legacy is a tribute to families and family traditions. The name also acknowledges the contributions of active and veteran military members and first-responders and the playing surfaces will be named to honor them.


Rob Eaton detailing the Sports Arena at the groundbreaking

The design was developed to bring the best experiences to both players and sports fans via open space viewing throughout the facility. The arena will incorporate some of the latest developments in green energy with both passive and active low-energy designs part of which will include rooftop solar panels generating electricity year round.

The Legacy Sports Arena portends to be one of the nicest sports facilities in the area and perhaps nation-wide with a restaurant, gymnasium, concession venue, artificial ice rink and other sports resources upstairs.


Drawing of the Legacy Sports Complex

The Legacy sports building would be innovative as a stand alone project, but Rob Eaton and the designers had more than that in mind when they created a vision for a destination facility. Hoping to attract tournament play, conventions, family vacationers and special events, in addition to the 170,000+ square foot sports arena, there will also be a hotel conceived specifically for players and spectators.


Drawing of the Legacy Hotel and Sports Arena

The lodging will incorporate larger team rooms and special amenities via available suites for team members as well as rooms for sports oriented families and guests.

Everyone who enjoys watching or playing sports should be excited about the future of the Legacy Sports Project. Congratulations to everyone involved for creating such a strong vision that will provide wonderful opportunities for the Phoenix metropolitan area.

Best wishes for much success!

 


Follow the News and Development of Legacy Sports Arena

Legacy News and Updates

View the Sports and Target Age Groups

Legacy Sports Arena Logo

 

Read more miscellaneous stories on JBRish HERE


**********

All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross 2014 – 2019 – JBRish.com



Soldier’s Son – Chungking Univeristy – 1944

“The soldier is the Army. No army is better than its soldiers. The Soldier is also a citizen. In fact, the highest obligation and privilege of citizenship is that of bearing arms for one’s country.” — George S. Patton

NOTE: You can read the introduction to this series HERE:


***************

Many of the photographs in today’s selection were taken in China circa 1944. By that time the war may have taken a turn in favor of the allies and perhaps there was great optimism that they would prevail, but I am not sure.

This series of photographs demonstrates how, even during wartime, there is a desire to achieve some sense of normalcy and for many they forge ahead with day-to-day life.


A view of the Yangtze River and Chungking, China circa 1944
A view of the Yangtze River from somewhere in Chungking, China – June, 1944
size – 4.75 x 3.60 square including white space

It is obvious from some of the markings that this picture (above) is well traveled as indeed it is 75 years old. At first I thought the two whitish rectangular objects (left) were defects in the photograph, but upon closer inspection, they appear to be attached to poles which are part of the structure. There is a dark blemish on the left-hand white rectangle


A photograph of US Soldiers with Chinese friends at the University in Chungking, China
“A photograph of US Soldiers with Chinese friends at the University in Chungking, China
size – 2.125 x 1.60 including white space

These students at the University of China developed a friendship with the American soldiers. Martin Ross is second from the left.


Martin Ross at the University of Chungking, China
I cannot be too sure where this picture was taken, but it was grouped with others taken at the University of Chungking in China and thus I assume that is the location of this picture.
size – 1.75 x 2.375 including white space



This group of soldiers is walking with a young woman associated with the University of Chungking.
size – 1.75 x 2.375 including white space

In this picture, the soldier on the right appears to be an officer. There is a notation on the back of the photograph “Chungking Univ. Feb, 1944 – Shoppin Pak” whether that is a name or not, I have no idea



Martin C. Ross with Bernard Liu
size – 1.75 x 2.375 including white space


My father always had a fondness for children. He enjoyed doing magic tricks and playing ball with them. It is curious to me that this Chinese boy was named Bernard on the back of the photograph. Whether that is an Americanization or not we will never know.

I wonder, if by any chance, this person named Bernard is still alive and if he would remember my father.

“No one is actually dead until the ripples they cause in the world die away” – Terry Pratchett

My father was not a cigarette smoker as far as I was aware so it is surprising to me that he has one in this photograph. He did enjoy cigars which were usually El Producto Coronas.

 

NOTE — All photographs are “for sale.” Anyone interested in purchasing photographs should contact me via the JBRish.com contact email, i.e. JBRish [dot]com [at] gmail[dot]]com

 
DISCLAIMER — Many of the photographs I will be presenting as part of this series are very small and/or very old. In order to enable proper viewing, I scan the images and enhance them to the extent possible using Adobe Lightroom or Photoshop software. These images are not manipulated to remove or modify the content. The enhancements are strictly to provide contrast, bring out details and to render black and white areas in more natural tones. Nothing has been removed or added. I will provide measurements of the actual photographs as they may seem larger than actual size because of the digital presentation.


**********

 

All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross 2014 – 2019 – JBRish.com


Soldier’s Son – Chungking and rural China

“The soldier is the Army. No army is better than its soldiers. The Soldier is also a citizen. In fact, the highest obligation and privilege of citizenship is that of bearing arms for one’s country.” — George S. Patton

NOTE: You can read the introduction to this series HERE:


***************

This is an interesting series of photographs that are small in size, but represent the period of history in World War II China circa 1944. I will indicate the approximate size: width x height


A scene in Chungking, China circa 1944
A scene in Chungking, China circa 1944
size – 2.25 x 2.52 square including white space

The photograph above is simply labeled, “some scene in China – Chungking.” It has a stamp indicating that it was passed by US Army Examiner, 23150.


A Chinese peasant working with his Ox in a field
A Chinese peasant working with his Ox in a field.
size – 3 x 2.5 including white space

The picture above had no annotation, but simply shows a peasant farmer working in the field with his ox.


A Miao Tribesman in China, circa 1944
A Miao Tribesman in China, circa 1944
size – 3 x 2.25 including white space

I have to admit that reviewing these pictures gives me pause. It is almost as if I am watching something that should be kept secret; that I am intruding in the lives of others even though they have most likely passed on. The photo above is labeled on the back as one of a “Miow Tribesman” [This is most likely a misspelling and the correct spelling is Miao Tribesman].

The man in this photograph looks as though he was young-ish, but has had a hard life. Who knows what happened to him or how he spent the years after the war? Perhaps he is somewhat bewildered by a non-Asian person with a camera.

Today the Miao ethnic group lives in southern China among other ethnic groups. The Miao generally live in mountainous areas away from urban centers. Apparently they have also migrated to other Asian nations such as Thailand and Vietnam. Read more about the Miao at — The Miao Minority

Interesting fact — The Hmong are actually a subgroup of the Miao and although China recognizes the Hmong as Miao, they are not technically the same. REFERENCE

A picture of the Miao constructing a runway surface in 1945 can be seen HERE


***************

NOTE — All photographs are “for sale.” Anyone interested in purchasing photographs should contact me via the JBRish.com contact email, i.e. JBRish [dot]com [at] gmail[dot]]com

 
DISCLAIMER — Many of the photographs presented as part of this series are very small and/or very old. In order to enable proper viewing, I scan the images and enhance them to the extent possible using Adobe Lightroom or Photoshop software. These images are not manipulated to remove or modify the content. The enhancements are strictly to provide contrast, bring out details and to render black and white areas in more natural tones. Nothing has been removed or added. I will provide measurements of the actual photographs as they may seem larger than actual size because of the digital presentation.


**********

 

All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross 2014 – 2019 – JBRish.com


A Soldier’s Son – Introduction

“The soldier is the Army. No army is better than its soldiers. The Soldier is also a citizen. In fact, the highest obligation and privilege of citizenship is that of bearing arms for one’s country.” — George S. Patton

 



Martin C. Ross’ final resting place at Arlington National Cemetery

My father was a soldier and he loved the army. He was a gritty guy and had little or no fear. This isn’t to say he was mean or aggressive; he wasn’t. He had a big heart and he was kind and generous.

My grandparents were Polish/Russian immigrants who came to America in the early 1900s to have a better life. They didn’t have it easy. As Jewish immigrants they faced much antisemitism and discrimination.

Over time, they learned English although they continued to speak Yiddish at home. During the depression my father spent time in a place he told me was an orphanage. He was forced to live away from his parents and family. He never forgot this chapter of his life and it had a profound effect on him.



My father Martin Ross and my mother, Beatrice have dinner – circa 1952

As a small child, all I knew was that my father was a soldier. I have to say that he wasn’t the only one in the army. We were all “in the army.” My mother had to put up with a lot as my father went off to war in Korea and left us at home. This wasn’t the only effect the army had on our lives. Like many military families, we moved quite a bit. It seemed to me it was every three or four years.



My father Martin Ross’ photo shortly after retiring from the Army in 1960

My father amassed a large number of military photographs during his career as a soldier. The reason I am starting this series is to share pictures I have related to life in the army, China during World War II, the Korean War and related topics. I have no children and these archives will be “tossed” when I die. I am hoping to share these with those who may be interested in military history or life during these eras.

The offerings in this series will not have any specific organization. I will publish the photographs and whatever notes are on the pictures as I get to them. I note approximate size: length x height as this proves pertinent.

To start the series, I offer the following…

**********

When my father was in China and Burma (now Myanmar) during World War II, entertainers would visit the troops from time-to-time to help them get a bit of relief from the wartime drudgery. Joe E. Brown (1891-1973) was a popular comedian and movie star. He was a very talented expressionist who would make faces with his rather large mouth.

Here is a picture of Joe E. Brown entertaining the troops in China. Notice the picture of Chiang Kai-shek behind him.



Joe E. Brown entertaining the troops in China during World War II



Notation on the back of the above photograph written by Martin C. Ross

Brown was accompanied by Harris Barris** who also appears in the picture above as well as the picture below which shows the two men mixing with the troops after the performance.



Harry Barris and Joe E. Brown mingling with the troops after the performance

* “Chiang Kai-shek, also known as Generalissimo Chiang or Chiang Chungcheng and romanized as Chiang Chieh-shih or Jiang Jieshi, was a politician and military leader who served as the leader of the Republic of China between 1928 and 1975, first in mainland China until 1949 and then in Taiwan until his death. – Via

** “Harry Barris was an American popular singer and songwriter, and is one of the earliest singers to use “scat singing” in recordings. Barris, one of Paul Whiteman’s Rhythm Boys, along with Bing Crosby and Al Rinker, scatted on several songs, including “Mississippi Mud,” which Barris wrote in 1927″ Via

NOTE – All photographs are “for sale.” Anyone interested in purchasing photographs should contact me via the JBRish.com contact email, i.e. JBRish [dot] com [at] gmail [dot] com


**********

 

All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross 2014 – 2019 – JBRish.com


An Out of This World Fruit

While I was shopping a week ago and I happened to walk around the produce section of my local Fry’s supermarket, I noticed the following gold and orange-ish item that was being displayed next to the avocados.


donut or Saturn peach

It looked like a peach, but it was squat like a turbin or one of those small decorative pumpkins. It wasn’t completely round like most peaches. And then I noticed this sign:


donut peach sign

These peaches, as noted below, are also called Saturn peaches so they really are “out of this world!”

I am not against donuts in any shape or form, but I have never heard of a donut peach. Have you? Here is another picture just for the record.


donut or Saturn peach

Upon investigation, I found this information:

Saturn’ peaches have an unusually flat shape, and are named for their resemblance to the rings of Saturn. They’re also called ‘Donut’ or ‘Doughnut’ peaches. In fact, many supermarkets package the flat peaches in long boxes like those used for doughnuts, and market them as a good-for-you snack food.

Via Mother Earth News

The Guardian Also had an article about them as well:

Doughnut peaches – the new craze

Who knew?

 

Read more miscellaneous stories on JBRish HERE


**********

All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross – 2018 – JBRish.com



Portugal – Alfama District, Lisbon Part 1

Breaking away from our routine of traveling to national parks in the United States, we decided to journey overseas with a noted tour company to see a part of the world in which we have been interested for a long time. So off it was to Portugal and Spain.


Map of Portugal with Lisbon noted

Map Via

We arrived in Lisbon relatively early in the day. After we checked in at our hotel, we were anxious to get out and about to visit some of the sights we researched. High on the list was the Alfama district in Lisbon.

One of Alfama’s distinctions is that it is the oldest neighborhood in Lisbon. It is located along the Tejo river and is very picturesque. The concierge at the hotel explained that we needed to take a taxi to the tram stop and then take the number 28 to Alfama.


Tram #28 headed to Alfama

The #28 tram’s route traverses the city’s center thus making it a very busy mode of transportation as tourists use this to arrive at many of Lisbon’s popular attractions. It is less expensive than a tour bus, but there is no guide to point out the sights. We had to be careful as there were two different #28 trams. We determined we needed the one with the destination noted as Prazeres.

You can read more about it HERE

This popular tram usually operates from 7AM until 11PM daily. Check out the current schedules to be sure.

NOTE – Pickpockets often frequent this tram so be careful and keep your valuables close. We had no problems at all (besides the usual language barrier).

Little did we understand that the tram was going to drop us off quite a distance from the main section of Alfama and that we also needed to board a small van to take us to Alfama’s central location; no extra charge. Streets are so narrow in places that cars cannot navigate them. Bicycles and smaller motorized transports are plentiful on these narrow side streets.

As we were walking to board the jitney, we passed a trash can that was quite unique. We didn’t realize that this was customary in Portugal and Spain. Trash/recycle receptacles are sometimes painted and serve as a work of contemporary art. The city sponsors some to the container art. Apparently a number of other European cities have adopted this colorful method of camouflaging these streetside bins.


Art covered trash=recycle bins

We managed to find our way to the small van and disembarked near the Miradouro das Portas do Sol (Viewpoint of the Doors of the Sun) which is a large terraced area with an elevated point of view looking over Alfama. The first thing visitors are going to notice is the famous red roofs. This is Alfama’s trademark!


Landmark red roofs of Alfama seen from Miradouro das Portas do Sol

In the picture above, the river is barely visible, but some of the prominent buildings can be clearly seen. The large building in the upper left (with the two towers) is the Church or Monastery of São Vicente de Fora which Wikipedia translates as “Monastery of St. Vincent .” Just off to the the right of the Monastery is the dome of the National Pantheon.

Saint Vincent is Lisbon’s patron saint and a statue to honor him stands as a sentinel at the Portas del Sol close to where most visitors will arrive at one point or another during their explorations. There are several vendors and street merchants at this location trying to capitalize on the crowds that often gather in this area.


Statue of Lisbon's patron saint, Saint Vincent

Here is another photograph of Alfama taken from the Miradouro de Santa Luzia which is another great viewing area. The Tejo river is located along the horizon. More central with a single tower visible is the iglesia de Santo Estevao (Church of St. Stephen).


Another view of the port of Alfama seen from Miradouro de Santa Luzia

As we began to make our way through the old streets of Alfama on the way to the Thieve’s Market, we passed by ancient structures. Here is a crossover near the Campo de Santa Clara (market square).


crossover near the Campo de Santa Clara (market square)

The Thieves Market is similar to flea markets around the world. It is only open on Tuesday and Saturdays in the square near the Panteão Nacional and São Vicente de Fora dating back to the late 1880’s.


Vendors at the Thieves Market in Alfama

There was a large variety of goods for sale including books, crafts and other typical flea market wares.


Wheelbarrow with dishes for sale

Read more about our Alfama excursions HERE!

 

Read more Hiking and Exploration posts HERE


**********


All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross – 2018 – JBRish.com



Tianjin, China Has A WOW! Library

There is an amazing library in Tianjin, China that has well over one million books. That would be unique enough for many, but what separates this library from all others is the unique design.

Look at the pictures below to gain an appreciation for this architectural wonder.




Via




Via



Via



Via

 
Read more about the Tianjin Library, click on the Via links above.

Read more miscellaneous stories on JBRish HERE


**********

All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross – 2018 – JBRish.com