Photography Quote — 20180708 – The Woodlands

Today’s Photography Quote


 

“Is not the smell of forests delicious? it seems to ascend like the smoke of incense.” — Henry James Slack, Journalist and Science Writer

 
The picture above was taken during our stop at the Ladybird Johnson Grove, in the Redwood National Park as we made our way north along the coast of California. Although the sun was shining, the shade of these majestic trees dimmed the forest floor. There was a wonderful light bouquet of decomposition that would waft up and envelop us at intervals.

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Photo Metadata

File Name:IMG_1658.CR2
Capture time: 11:06 PM
Capture date: September 25, 2014
Exposure: 1/30 @ f5.0
Focal Length: 4.3mm
ISO: 200
Canon Powershot SX50HS

*Edited: Lightroom

 
See previous STATUS QUOtes Photography Quotes HERE


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All content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross – 2018


Photography: My Shot at Puente Nuevo – Ronda, Spain


Puento Nuevo - Ronda Spain

It was an unusual decision for us, but we decided to take a trip to Portugal and Spain this spring. Usually we enjoy hiking the national parks and beautiful areas of the United States while our knees and joints can still take to the hills and dales America the beautiful has to offer.

One of our favorite stops on the tour was Puento Nuevo in the town of Ronda Spain. My wife and I often remark at the historic nature of towns in Europe which are very old compared to those in the United States. We tend to think of something as being old if it was founded two hundred years ago, but in Europe we are often talking about multiples of that or even thousands of years.

Ronda was first settled in the sixth century B.C. That is old! The photograph above is one of my favorite shots from our trip. It was taken from the Puente Nuevo bridge which is the largest of a number of bridges spanning the gorge of the Guadalevín River that meanders through Ronda. I was hoping to capture the beauty and uniqueness of this spot and I think I managed to do so fairly well.

 

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Metadata

File Name: ronda_spain_PuentoNuevo_DSC_3082.jpg
Capture time: 9:36 AM
Capture date: May 16, 2018
Exposure: 1/320 sec @ f/9.0
Focal Length: 22mm
ISO: 100
Camera: Nikon D3300
Lens: 18.0 – 55.12mm f/3.5-5.6
Edited in Lightroom

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See more photography posts HERE and visit Jeff’s Instagram site HERE


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All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross – 2018 – JBRish.com



The Broccoli Tree: A Parable

I want to share the story below, The Parable of the Broccoli Tree, because I think we can all identify with what happens in this story. Although the main focus of the story is one about photography, it applies to many facets of life and that’s what seems to make the message a universal one.

At one point in my career I was an elementary school principal and one of the favorite books in the school library was Shel Silverstein’s The Giving Tree. Although one could argue this is a children’s book, it touches a chord in me every time I read it.

As you arrive at the end of the story, realize that this is a dilemma many creatives and especially photographers face. I even see examples of this that are unrelated to photography, but associated with the popularity of a specific features in our national parks.

I hope you find the story meaningful!

Read more miscellaneous stories on JBRish HERE


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All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross – 2018 – JBRish.com



Photography Quote — 20180606

Today’s Photography Quote

 

“There is only you and your camera. The limitations in your photography are in yourself, for what we see is what we are.” – Ernst Haas

Learn more about Ernst Haas HERE!

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Every photographer develops a style and favors particular subjects such as landscapes, astrophotography, architecture, etc. Through their choice of subject matter, they capture images and process them to match their creative vision.

Some photographers have such a distinctive style and vision what when you see one of their shots, you know it. The quote above reminds me of our individual approach to the broad field of photography.

Of course I am not speaking about myself or my photographs, although the photograph above is representative of my “style” and “vision.” I captured this scene because of the deep shadows and the reflections. I find reflections and how they are distorted by the object on which they are reflected quite interesting.

For many viewers, the scene may not be obvious at first because of the abstract nature of the reflections in the slow-moving stream. I hope that readers will stop to examine the scene to grasp and appreciate the content.

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Photo Metadata

File Name: _west fork trail_oak_creek_canyon_IMG_0073.CR2
Capture time: 12:24 PM
Capture date: November 9, 2015
Exposure: 1/160 @ f5.0
Focal Length: 7.24mm
ISO: 100
Canon Powershot SX50HS

*Edited: Lightroom

 
See previous STATUS QUOtes Photography Quotes HERE


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All content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross – 2018


Hue wouldn’t believe my Fuji X T-2 Mishap

“Experience is a good teacher, but she sends in terrific bills.”   —   Minna Antrim

My adventure with the Fuji X T-2 started almost a year ago. I use the word adventure deliberately because that has been my experience. I have read two books about how to set up and use the X T-2, but like much technology, all the books in the world often cannot prevent the unpredictable from happening.

What I am about to explain is not technically the fault of the camera and I have to admit that all errors of the sort I am about to explain are clearly on the shoulders of the user; ME. I am merely writing this article so that perhaps others can avoid the frustration and/or disappointment that such occurrences can cause.

OK, by now you are probably wondering “What happened already!”

I recently returned from a trip to Portugal and Spain and of course I could not wait to download my photos to my computer once I got home. Imagine my surprise when all the JPEGs I shot with the X T-2 had a strong magenta cast to them. I was amazed since I had just used the camera prior to the trip without any problems. I couldn’t figure out what went wrong.

Here is what the JPEGS looked like once imported into Lightroom:



I don’t do much international travel. Usually I am headed for landscapes in and around national parks or similar venues in the United States. When I do that, I often take a computer with me and each evening I download and review the files to double check that all is working as anticipated. I can then see if there is dirt on the lens or sensors and whether the settings are basically correct.

Since I would be with a group on this trip and I was concerned about securing a computer when it was not with me and traveling light, I decided to leave the computer at home.

There was another aspect that should have been a clue to me, but I didn’t pay enough attention to it. I was “lulled” into a sense of security.

Let me explain: When looking through the viewfinder (EVF), there was a color cast to the live view image. I ignored it under the assumption that I had inadvertently adjusted the live view setting and that the pictures would not be affected. In the X T-2 references, I read about adjusting the EVF Color so I thought (my bad again!) that I had adjusted the EVF color inadvertently. This was a clue that I should have investigated further.

What “lulled” me into this mindset was the knowledge that the white balance was set to AUTO so how bad could it be? When I would quickly look at the LCD, it wasn’t that obvious to me that there was a color shift.

So imagine my surprise or disbelief when I arrived home and downloaded the pictures and saw that every JPEG had this rather overwhelming magenta color. I was truly puzzled. Trying to correct the JPEGs in Lightroom was very difficult, but what saved me in this instance was shooting RAW plus JPEG. The RAW files, although the finder images showed the same cast, were rendered perfectly once developed in LR.

I tried searching on the Internet and through two books and the owner’s manual to see what the problem might have been. I was like a sailor lost at sea. I really didn’t know what I didn’t know. Thank goodness Fuji has an excellent support team. I called them and within five minutes I had the answer to my problem and learned how to avoid it in the future.

APPARENTLY one of my settings was accidentally changed so that the white balance, although set to AUTO, was manually altered to change the hue of the light when a photo was captured. Like much advanced technology, the X T-2 provides a multitude of choices and with choices comes the possibility of more user errors or “accidental” system changes.

This is what I learned after my call to the support center:



The right selector button (see arrow above) surrounding the rear menu botton is set to change white balance hue by default. There is no lock on this button so when removing the camera from the camera bag, pressing that function button launches an option to change the white balance default color. If not noticed the user can be into the indavertent change for two or three unintended presses before taking the next shot. If it happens when the camera is being placed into the bag and being turned off, it may go unnoticed.

Here is my Tenba bag with my cameras in it.



A closer look shows the arrow pointing to the area of the X T-2 where the selector button in question would be directly on the top side (see arrow below).



You can imagine how it was possible or perhaps probable that the selector button would be pressed when grabbing the camera to take it out of the bag for shooting which I did several times a day.

The technician at Fuji recommended that I change that partuclar function button to provide playback (a safe choice) which would remove that potential problem from my shooting workflow. Of course I also rebalanced the hue to the neutral position while I was making that change.

This was my fault for not knowing what options these buttons controlled and what pressing them can do. You can bet that I will be checking them all before my next shoot! Would it be better perhaps for these buttons to be undefined by default and allow the users to program them as they see fit once the camera arrives at their door?

Takeaways:

The Good:

I was shooting RAW plus JPEG which saved the pictures for me this time. I lost the ability to rely on the JPEGs for color reference, etc., but that was only a small price to pay (IMO) compared to what could have been.

I had a second camera with which I was much more familiar and I took “near duplicates” of the important shots so I had many more pictures to cover myself if the Fuji pics fell short. This goes back to my analog days of doing some professional gigs where I always had multiple cameras “just in case!”

The Bad:

I should have…

Spent more time and care assessing the photos via the LCD to check for color balance, sharpness, etc.

Understood the purpose of the function buttons before going out into the field. Interesting that I have been using it for several months and haven’t had this problem before.

Checked both cards in playback mode from time-to-time before getting home just to check on things.

Given more importance to taking my laptop with me. Perhaps this would have been the wiser thing, but I am still not certain about this one.

 

Overall, this was not a disaster and I did capture some nice shots. To paraphrase and borrow from an Oprah Winfrey quote:

“I am a photographer in process. I’m just trying like everybody else. I try to take every conflict, every experience, and learn from it. Life and photography is never dull.”

 
See more photography posts HERE and visit Jeff’s Instagram site HERE


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All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross – 2018 – JBRish.com



Photography: My Shot – Reflections on Dinner

I have always been interested in lighting, shadows and reflections. Most of us have probably looked at reflections of ourselves in a glass ball, a jar or perhaps a glass doorknob and became interested, if not fascinated, about the distorted representation of ourselves.

I recently returned to a restaurant we like which has a great view of the Phoenix, AZ valley. As a matter of fact, the restaurant is called Different Pointe of View. It is part of the Pointe Hilton Tapatio Cliffs complex in the Moon Valley section of Phoenix. The hotel and restaurant sit on a mountain top.

While we were dinning, the sun set and as I looked at the view of the valley in the large glass windows, not only could I see the city lights, I could see the reflection of our dinner table and it was mesmerizing.


Reflections of Dinner at a Different Point of View
“Reflections of Dinner at a Different Point of View”

The coffee cups and teapot are very discernable as are the two frontmost glases of water. What makes the photo most interesting to me is the reflection of the two people in the foreground combined with a view of the distant city lights. When I consider this was taken with my iPhone, I am pleased with the abstract result.

 

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Metadata

File Name: reflections_on_dinner_1431.JPG
Capture time: 8:38:34 PM
Capture date: march 17, 2018
Exposure: 1/15 sec @ f/2.4
Focal Length: 4.12mm
ISO: 3200
Camera: iPhone 5
Lens: 4.12mm f/2.4

Edited in Lightroom

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Read more photography posts HERE


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All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross – 2018 – JBRish.com



Photography: Videos – Landscape Hints and Ideas

There are many, many videos on the Internet related to almost every aspect of photography ranging from the technical to the artistic and abstract and everything in between. One field of photography in which I have a strong interest is landscape photography and hobbyists can spend days on end watching nothing but videos about landscape photography.

I have seen dozens over the years and I want to highlight the two resources below because I feel they are especially well done and they have worthy ideas that may be new for many.

My TOP 5 best TIPS for composition in Landscape Photography
by Mads Peter Iversen

Mads Peter Iversen offers his most important tips for successful landscape photography. What I liked about this 16:35 video is that Mads not only offers his ideas, but then he demonstrates what he wishes to convey by showing examples. This makes it immensely useful!

Here are his five areas of concentration in the video below:

  • Focal point
  • Leading lines
  • Brightness, contrast and faces
  • Balance
  • Elements within the frame and the need for “breathing room”

Simple IDEAS for CREATIVE outdoor photography
by Nigel Danson

From the YouTube page:

The possibilities in photography are endless. Landscape photography is no different. Whatever the light or location you can get great images. In this video I talk a bit more about getting creative with out of focus elements and intentional camera movement ICM. And preview the ICELAND series coming soon….

See more photography posts HERE and visit Jeff’s Instagram site HERE showcasing a number of landscape photographs.


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All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross – 2018 – JBRish.com



Photography: Why Use Post Processing Software?

Although I had been interested in photography as far back as my teenage years, after my thirties and a number of life changes, photography took a back seat to my other interests and obligations of life.

I had used professional gear in my twenties and early thirties, but for many years after, I used a point-and-shoot digital camera with between 5 and 8 megapixels. (As a frame of reference, today’s standards would probably call for a minimum of 16 or 24 megapixels for professional use.) My Canon AS590 IS provided a no muss, no fuss regimen for me and I was comfortable just capturing ptographs as a matter of record.

Of course as time passed, post processing software improved and I became interested in revisiting some of my older photographs and trying to “process” them to bring out the colors and beauty that encouraged me to take the photographs in the first place.

When pondering the question, “Why use post processing software,” let me offer the following.

My wife and I enjoy hiking and exploring as readers of JBRish.com know. In 2012, we visited Monument Valley, UT. Sure enough, I had my Canon PowerShot AS590 with 8 megapixels. It took very nice jpeg photographs. Unfortunately, however, the settings and ability of the small sensor was limiting.

Look at this picture for example:


Original picture of the Yei Bi Chei Spires and the Totem Pole
Original picture of the Yei Bi Chei Spires and the Totem Pole

The above is a composition in which I was very interested, but the bright sky and haze did not enable the camera to represent the scene as I envisioned it. The camera did the best it could capturing the scene, but the equipment didn’t render the red rocks and sand as I saw it. The green and yellow grasses played well against the red rocks, but you wouldn’t know it by looking at the photo above.

This shot remained dormant on my hard drive for years and then I began to learn about Adobe Lightroom. Once I understood the basics, I realized I could recapture some of the colors and nuances of the shot that inspired me to take the photograph in the first place.

Once processed, the scene is rendered more as I saw it that afternoon.


Processed picture of the Yei Bi Chei Spires and the Totem Pole
Processed picture of the Yei Bi Chei Spires and the Totem Pole

Keep in mind that this camera has a very small sensor and by today’s standard is probably equivalent to a smartphone or perhaps less than that. When looking at the picture, understand that the camera did capture information such as which areas are brown, red, green, blue, light, dark, etc. It took the software to help me bring out the colors and contrast nearer to as I recalled them when I stopped to press the shutter. Some of the detail is lost in the transition and the picture is more painterly than I would prefer, but it is certainly closer to my recollection than the original the camera recorded.

This is why post processing software and learning how to use it properly is so popular!

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Metadata

File Name: 8871_yei_bi_chei_spires_totempole.JPG
Capture time: Sept. 10, 2012
Exposure: 1/400 sec @ f/4.5
Focal Length: 16mm
ISO: 80
Camera: Canon PowerShot AS590 IS
Lens: 4.3-215mm

Edited in Lightroom

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See more JBRish.com photography posts HERE and visit Jeff’s Instagram site HERE


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All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross – 2018 – JBRish.com



Photography: My Shot – Larnach Castle Garden, Dunedin, NZ


When we visited New Zealand in 2009, the only camera I took with me was a very small point-and-shoot Canon AS590 IS, which at that time was considered fairly good for its class. Even with this small-ish 8 megapixel count, I was able to capture some amazing pictures.

The photograph below was taken at Larnach Castle in Dunedin, New Zealand. The sky was overcast and the colors were vibrant in themselves. This photo was edited a bit in Lightroom, but trust me when I say that this was a striking picture before the editing process.

I encourage everyone to record their adventures as large or small as they may be with whatever camera or smart phone they have with them. The images will be a treasure to review and appreciate over time.

Interestingly enough, there were a number of plants in this garden that we grow in our Sonoran Desert area.


Stormy skies over Larnach Castle Garden, Dunedin, NZ
Stormy skies over Larnach Castle Garden, Dunedin, NZ

You can find more information about the Larnach Castle & Gardens HERE

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Metadata

File Name: larnach_cast_grdn_)133.jpg
Capture time: Early Afternoon
Capture date: December 17, 2009
Exposure: 1/1000 5.8mm
ISO: 80
Camera: Canon PowerShot AS590 IS
Lens: 4.3-215mm

Edited in Lightroom

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Read more photography posts HERE


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All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross – 2018 – JBRish.com



Photography: My Shot – Yaquina Head Lighthouse

While hiking down the coast of Oregon, we enjoyed visiting a number of lighthouses along the picturesque coastline. A challenge photographers face when they arrive at such an area is that many other people want to enjoy the same view and that is a good thing!

The issue is how to capture a picture with as few distracting elements as possible. There have been several times when I have been at a prominent place in a national park where the scene was spectacular, but in the field of view there was a couple having lunch or a snack wearing bright orange or luminescent green garments.

Obviously this can be addressed by waiting for the people to move or fix it in post processing. In the picture below, there were a number of people, cars, RVs, etc.(middle right) that would prove problematic for the composition for reasons mentioned above. Rather than work on each piece in Photoshop, I decided to use a toned, black and white image (duotone) to maintain the focus on the distant lighthouse.

I hope it works as I thought it would!


Yaquina Head Lightouhse & Naural Area, Newport

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Metadata

File Name: oregon_coast_XT2A0212.RAF
Capture time: Sept. 11, 2017
Exposure: 1/30 sec @ f/13
Focal Length: 28.9mm
ISO: 200
Camera: Fuji X-T2
Lens: XF18-55mm, F2.8-4 R LM OIS

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See Jeff’s other photographs on Instagram


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All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross – 2018 – JBRish.com