Portugal – Lisbon’s Edward VII Park

During our brief explorations in Lisbon, we stayed in the southern part of the city very near the Parque Eduardo VII (Edward VII Park). This is the largest park in the city and serves as a hub for many activities. It is well situated to the north of the Praca do Marques de Pombal (square) and the major Avenida da Liberdade with its inviting promenades. The park was named after King Edward VII of the United Kingdom to commemorate his 1902 visit to Portugal.

A large flag of Portugal flies proudly at the northern end of the park which is a very good place to start a walk.


large Portuguese flag

Here is a brief orientation via the photograph below… Just to the right of the flag (east) is a fountain. On either side of the large grassy area are walkways lined with trees. The large grey-roofed building on the left (west) contains three greenhouses which, unfortunately, were closed when we hiked through the park. The park was being readied for a large book fair.


aerial view of the King Edward VII Park

This is a closeup of the founatain which two dogs couldn’t resist as we watched them frolick in the cool waters.


Fountain at the north of the Edward VII park


dogs playing in the King Edward VII fountain

This is one of the tree-lined pedestrian boulevards that run north/south through the park. Like nearly every metropolitan park, there were groups of people enjoying the surroundings for a variety of activities. A number of people found the shaded benches a pleasnt place to read or visit with friends.


tree-lined, cobblestone walk of the Edward VII park

There were a couple of people who were tempted to take a nap on the grassy fields punctuated with maze-like manicured shrubs.


people napping along the grassy strip of the Edward VII park

The statue of the Marques de Pombal was clearly visible from the northern vantage points.


distant view of Alfama district and the Marques de Pombal statue from the Edward VII park

In the photograph below, the hilly area to the left is the Alfama district with the Tejo River in the background. The treed area south of the statue is the Avenida da Liberdade.


Closer southern view from the Edward VII park

The beautiful building below resembles a church, but is actually the Carlos Lopes Sports Pavilion located on the eastern boundary of the park nicely framed by the trees.


Carlos Lopes Sports Pavilion

As we left the park and headed farther south, I stopped to snap another photograph of the statue of the Marques de Pombal since other attempts were taken during less favorable conditions.


Marques de Pombal statue

We then began our stroll along the very cosmopolitan and attracitve Avenida da Liberdade


…To Be Continued.

 

Learn More:

Edward VII Park

Parque Eduardo VII

Marquis of Pombal Square


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Read previous posts about our adventures traveling in Portugal and Spain:

Portugal – Alfama District, Lisbon Part 1

Portugal – Alfama District, Lisbon Part 2

Portugal – Lisbon Streets & Garden

Lisbon Portugal – The Belem and Tejo River District

Sintra Portugal – National Palace and Quaint Streets

Portugal – Seaside Resort of Cascais

 

Read more Hiking and Exploration posts HERE


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All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross 2014 – 2018 – JBRish.com



Spring Buzz in the Sonoran Desert

In the Sonoran Desert spring is often like early summer in other locations in the United States with the temperatures often in the mid-70s to mid-80s. We often refer to this as the “sweet spot” since we don’t need heat or air conditioning for the most part. We do know what is ahead of us, but we enjoy this respite while it lasts.

Along with spring, we have some interesting developments. Our neighborhood has a number of horse stables and about two weeks ago, a young colt was born. Like many other babies, he can be very energetic one minute and flat out tired and sleeping the next.

Here is a short video of the youngster running around.

Today I passed the corral on the way home and the colt was nursing, but when I exited the car, he stopped. I decided to take a photo anyway.


The colt is on the left. The mother often stays rather far away, but was next to him this day.

The horse “next door” came over and I decided he needed to have his picture taken as well.



Another sign of spring is the plethora of bees we have on the few plants that are now blooming. We have a Mastic Tree (Pistacia lentiscus) that is loaded with very small flowers.



The morning I walked by the tree, the buzz was loud and persistent. I decided to record it, but it is only a shadow of the real sound as the iPhone has limitations. You can hear the bees in the sound clip below (raise the sound on your computer/device).

Unfortunately, I did not have my camera with me and I couldn’t capture the mass of bees all over the tree. They were flitting about too quickly for iPhone capture.

A couple of days later, I was able to take my camera outside in the afternoon, but the bees were not as numerous. I did take a few snapshots anyway.


The bee is hard to see, but it is inside the red oval.

I was able to capture another view with the pollen sack showing although once again, it is hard to see.


The head of the bee is by the yellow arrow. The pollen sack is at the tip of the red arrow.

We have already begun our spring/summer gardening chores and we are looking forward to sharing some of our experiences with JBRish readers. I hope your weather is looking more spring-like!

 

Read more miscellaneous stories HERE


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All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross – 2018 – JBRish.com



Adventures in Oregon: Adventures in Oregon: Cape Lookout, South Trail

It had been raining the day before and we had previously had our share of grey, misty days so we were excited to find the clouds lifting and the sun breaking through.

The majesty represented by a beautiful tree and a well-populated forest always resonated with my spirit and the South Trail on Cape Lookout did not disappoint in this respect.

The trail begins very modestly.


A trail through the woods
The South Trail of Cape Lookout Begins

Soon the coast appears to add interest to the hike. The fog was still rather low, but was beginning to lift.


Fog was lifting as we began our hike.
The fog was lifting to reveal more of the ocean

As we moved further inland, the forest began to reveal some of its interesting sights. The ferns growing in the nooks and crannies of the tree limbs are known as basket ferns. This area is close enough to the shore to provide ample moisture for these plants to thrive.


Ferns growing in the crooks of tree limbs
Ferns growing in the crooks of tree limbs known as basket ferns

As the trail meandered through forest and intermittently along the coastline, we were treated to vistas of the ocean and shore.


Coastline vista
The trail reveals vistas of the coast

This was a picturesque cove that we stopped to admire both coming and going!


A picturesque cove
A picturesque cove shows can be seen through a break in the tree line

The path was very muddy in places because of the recent rains.


A muddy path
The path was muddy from overnight rains

On the return trip, we began to encounter more hikers. Luckily we started early enough to have the trail to ourselves during most of the hike to the cape. In season, I would anticipate larger crowds.

This (below) was one of my favorite stops along the trail. The colorful browns and greens and the mist-laden atmosphere was very captivating.


A serene landscape along the trail
A serene landscape along the trail

Here is another shot of the coast showing one of the panoramic views from the trail.


A panoramic view of the coast
A panoramic view of the coast

Not actually a flower, this Chicken of the Woods wild mushroom (Laetiporus sulphureus), was as nice as many wildflowers.


beautiful wild mushroom
Nature’s art seen in a beautiful wild mushroom

As we neared the parking area, we came across yet another Banana slug. They grow them big in this wooded area as the quarter coin next to it demonstrates!


Large Banana slug
Large Banana slug

While some may feel that the South Trail of Cape Lookout does not have a remarkable payoff at the end, it is a nice vantage point for whale watching and looking at the ocean. Keep in mind that getting there is more than half the fun!


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Read previous posts about our adventures hiking and exploring in Oregon:

Exploring Astoria, Oregon – Part 1

Exploring Astoria, Oregon – Part 2

Exploring Astoria, Oregon – Part 3

Adventures in Oregon: Warrenton to Seaside

Adventures in Oregon: Hiking at Indian Beach

Adventures in Oregon: Views from Ecola Point

Adventures in Oregon: Movin’ On Down the Road

Adventures in Oregon: Garibaldi’s Graces and Pier

Adventures in Oregon: Tillamook – Cape Meares Lighthouse

 

Read more Hiking and Exploration posts HERE


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All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross – 2018 – JBRish.com



Cape Meares, lighthouse, ocean, pacific, beach, scenery, history, landscape, pacific ocean

Funny Pictures: Trees Eat!

With all of the intense weather, volcanoes, etc. we really don’t need any more proof about the power of nature. Mother nature does what she does sometimes in spite of the efforts of mankind.

One example of this is the behavior of trees. I have seen examples of this when I have been hiking, but I haven’t seen any as extreme as the one pictured below.



A tree face created by nature’s indomitable will!

If you want to see more examples of trees growing in unusual places and around man’s barriers, check out BuzzFeed’s 17 Trees That Love Eating Almost As Much As You Do

 

Read more miscellaneous JBRish.com stories HERE


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All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross – 2018 – JBRish.com



Year of Yosemite (YOY) – Day 175 (Trees Just Want to Survive)

Trees throw roots out to survive

Trees take hold among the rocky hills of Yosemite

It never ceases to AMAZE ME how trees (and other plants) find toe holds in the most unlikely places and manage to grow, if not thrive, at least for a while. Among the multitude of trees we walked past on our hikes, many of them managed to spread their roots out wherever they could make them fit.

In this photo you can see how there is a series of roots in the bottom, right-hand quadrant that wind through the pathways left by parting rocks and tumble over them to gain and maintain a foothold.

It is difficult to know which came first, the roots of this tree or the large rocks and boulders. The fact that the root appears to be growing on top of some of the rocks probably indicate that the stones must have preceded the growth of the root.

Surface roots often provide an obstacle course as it seems they try to “nip at” the toes of hikers as they walk by.

 
Do you have a question about our visit to Yosemite? Ask it in the comment section.

 

JBRish.com originally published this post
*All photographs Copyright by Jeffrey B. Ross with all rights reserved.

 
See previous Year of Yosemite (YOY) posts HERE. If you want to read the introduction to the YOY series, CLICK HERE.

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Meta Data – Day 175 YOY – Year of Yosemite

File Name: 3534.JPG
Capture time: 1:13:23 PM
Capture date: June 7, 2016
Exposure: 1/160 sec @ f/4
Focal Length: 5.8mm
ISO 80
Canon PowerShot A590 IS

 

Funny Bears Video – Natural Humor

Bears often find trees to use as scratching posts. Those who study bears will often place wire on trees they understand are popular with the bears to harvest the hair and analyze DNA for tracking information, etc. We don’t often get to see the bears enjoying themselves so much, but I think you will also enjoy this humorous video that is accompanied by a very fitting musical score.

From the YouTube Video Listing:

Published on Nov 11, 2016

Sometimes bears have an itch they just have to scratch! Episode two details below. The second episode of Planet Earth II focuses on mountains.

Please check local listings for specific information:
· UK, BBC1 13th Nov, Sunday, 8pm
· Nordics (BBC Earth channel), 13th Nov, Sunday, 8pm

A BBC Studios Natural History Unit production, co-produced with BBC America, ZDF, Tencent and France Télévisions.

Subscribe to the BBC Earth YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c…
BBC Earth YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/BBCEarth

BBC Earth Facebook http://www.facebook.com/bbcearth
BBC Earth Twitter http://www.twitter.com/bbcearth
BBC Earth Instagram https://www.instagram.com/bbcearth/?h…

Visit http://www.bbc.com/earth/world for all the latest animal news and wildlife videos

This is a channel from BBC Worldwide who help fund new BBC programmes.

My Homage to Trees

Trees have always been magical or should I say mystical to me. My first true relationship with a tree was with that of a large chestnut tree in the Bronx, NYC. It was near our elementary school and grew tall alongside a hill we used for sledding in the winter and for rolling down in cardboard boxes in the spring and summer.

I was very young, perhaps seven years old. It was a very large tree as I remember and the chestnuts were a beautiful; a rich dark brown and so very smooth. Each Chestnut pod held two rather large half-domed seeds that were shiny and precious.

I was in further awe of nature when I realized that a huge oak tree could be brought forth from the growth of a small, seemingly innocuous acorn.

I agree with Joyce Kilmer. Trees are very special. The video below is an ode to trees. It ushers forth many of the feelings I have toward these living sentinels who retain their footholds at the behest of man.

NOTE: The reader has an accent which may make it difficult to understand all of the words, but I don’t think words are needed.

The Silent Friends

The Silent Friends from Kauri Multimedia on Vimeo.

NOTE: I first came across this video via an article, The Silent Friends: A Beautiful Short Film Celebrating Our Abiding Bond with Trees, from the brainpickings website. If you are in search of intellectually stimulating and far reaching topics, you might enjoy stopping by.