Taliesin West Evening Tour Photo Essay

Part 9

On the way to the Cabaret Theater, we walked past the room pictured in the two photos below. It appears to be a mixture of formal and informal touches designed for meeting and/or eating.


Apparent mixed-decor meeting or dining area
This room appeared to be a mixed-decor meeting or dining area


Apparent mixed-decor meeting or dining area

The evening tour ended with a final visit to the Cabaret Theater. This is an area (below) where movies were shown or smaller concerts held.


The Cabaaret Theater
The Cabaaret Theater – overwhelmingly red


Geometric lighting fixture in the Cabaret Theater
Once again we notice a Geometric lighting fixture in the Cabaret Theater

 
NOTE – Keep in mind that this series represents only a partial exploration of the evening tour at Taliesin West. There was much more included with many stories and insights offered. The docent was very experienced and knowledgeable.

We will end this photo essay with a quote by Wright himself:

“The longer I live, the more beautiful life becomes.” – Frank Lloyd Wright

 

Read more about Taiesin West HERE.

Previous posts and photographs in the Taliesin West series in chronological order:


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All content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross



#taliesin #taliesinwest #franklloydwright #music

Taliesin West Evening Tour Photo Essay

Part 8

What motivates many people to take tours such as that offered at Taliesin West, is the interesting discoveries that await. There are so many nooks and crannies at Wright’s Arizona estate, that one never knows what will be found in the next room or just around the corner.

The picture below shows a detailed oriental sculpture that sat upon a dentil shelf in the Kiva Room that was used for conferences, etc. This evening they served cookies and juice.


The Kiva conference roo
A detail from the Kiva (conference room)

Taliesin has its own Music Pavilion.


The Pavilion theater
The Music Pavilion

This mural (below) in the Music Pavilion is called “City by the Sea” which some explain was Frank Lloyd Wright’s interpretation of the Chicago skyline.


City by the Sea mural in the Music Pavilion
City by the Sea mural in the Music Pavilion

 

Read more about Taiesin West HERE.

Previous posts and photographs in the Taliesin West series in chronological order:


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All content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross



Taliesin West Evening Tour Photo Essay

Part 6

While sitting in the Living Room at Taliesin West and looking at a good number of lighting fixtures and other elements, it was obvious that Wright favored geometric shapes especially the triangle.


Pyramidal shaped light fixtures
Pyramidal shaped light fixtures and square stools near the stone fireplace


Pyramidal light fixtures closer view
A closer view of the Pyramidal light fixtures


Another geometric light fixture
Another geometric inspired light fixture

 

Read more about Taiesin West HERE.

Previous posts and photographs in the Taliesin West series in chronological order:


**********

 

All content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross



Taliesin West Evening Tour Photo Essay – Part 5

Frank Lloyd Wright understood that a building cannot be a home without appropriate furnishings. He was concerned about decorating the rooms in a style that would enhance the overall architecture and aesthetic of each area.


Decorative Chinese theater scene
An example of the decorative ceramic Chinese theater scenes

Chinese theater scenes are placed throughout the estate with some used to mark transitions from one area to another.


Taliesin West wall of art
Room-separating artwork wall with sculptures and stones


The living room at Taliesin West
Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin West living room

 

Read more about Taiesin West HERE.

Previous posts and photographs in the Taliesin West series in chronological order:


**********

 

All content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross



Taliesin West Evening Tour Photo Essay – Part 4

In yesterday’s post about our evening tour of Taliesin West, I showed photographs of the drafting studio where students do their work based on the design principals taught at the school.

In those photographs, the reflecting pool was not visible. This water feature adds a very nice element to the landscaping that is both visually and auditorily pleasing. The pictures below show the pool located in front of the steps and lawn.


Reflecting pool in front of the studio
The lights reflect artistically in the pool at night and add visual interest


More detail can be seen when lit with a flash
Using a flash to light the scene reveals more reflecting pool details

NOTE – We were allowed to enter the drafting studio briefly, but we were not allowed to take any photographs or make any noise. Interacting with students was understandably not permitted.

It will become obvious to the most casual observer that Frank Lloyd Wright was a collector. He had a variety of interests such as petroglyphs (see post #2) and other types of art. Guests walking around the grounds will notice different statues and artwork prominently displayed.


Moon over statue of archer
This metal sculpture of an archer was partnered with a full moon this evening

 

Read more about Taiesin West HERE.

Previous posts and photographs in the Taliesin West series in chronological order:


**********

 

All content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross



Taliesin West Evening Tour Photo Essay – Part 3

While there are many interesting and innovative elements to be seen and appreciated at Taliesin West, visitors are reminded that first and foremost, this was and is an architectural training facility. This evening several students were busy working in the drafting studio seen here lit against the evening.


The tour group stopped at one end of the studio to peak through a window
The tour group stopped at one end of the studio to peak through a window

Although the docent had a flashlight and there were light fixtures on the grounds, some of the walks were a bit uneven and visitors used their cell phones to help light the way. It might be a good idea to bring a small flashlight for the evening tour if you think you might have difficulty seeing the paths.


An angled side view of the studiog
An angled side view of the studio


A better lit photo of the drafting studio with lawn and steps
A better lit photo of the drafting studio with lawn and steps

 

Read more about Taiesin West HERE.

Previous posts and photographs in the Taliesin West series in chronological order:


**********

 

All content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross



Taliesin West Evening Tour Photo Essay – Part 2

Before leaving the studio/office area for the introduction to the tour, the docent pointed to a concept drawing dubbed “The Oasis” which Wright submitted for the construction of the Arizona Capitol building. Apparently too innovative for its time, the design was not accepted. – Read more about it HERE.


AZ State Capitol Rendering
Wright’s concept drawing for Arizona State Capitol Building

Taliesin West backs up to the McDowell Mountains, a beautiful range in Scottsdale, AZ. While the development of Taliesin ensued, petroglyphs were located in the area and collected by Wright who found them of great interest. You can read about a petroglyph project on the property HERE.

“Frank Lloyd Wright was fascinated by the petroglyphs he saw in southern Arizona. It is not a coincidence that he located his winter home adjacent to a cluster of petroglyphs at the foot of the McDowell Mountains outside of Scottsdale.”


Petroglyph located at Taliesin
Wright was intrigued by Petroglyphs and collected some

This (below) is an interesting anomaly we come across in the desert on occasion. A seed of one plant or another finds the smallest of crevices and decides to make it home. Most of these volunteer plants live a shortened life because of the generally less-than-ideal location. This cactus has made its home in a hole in the wall; so to speak.

NOTE – There is a chance that this particular cactus was deliberately planted in the wall, but there is no way to know for sure.


Cactus living in a rock wall
Some plants volunteer to grow in the strangest places.

 

Read more about Taiesin West HERE.

Previous posts and photographs in the Taliesin West series in chronological order:


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All content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross



Taliesin West Evening Tour Photo Essay – Part 1

Introduction: – Photos Below (Please scroll down)

We have lived in the North Phoenix, AZ area for more than ten years. During our time in the Sonoran Desert, we have heard many things about Taliesin West, Frank Lloyd Wright’s architectural studio and school. Our interest had been piqued a number of times, but we wanted to wait for a special guest or visitor to express a desire to tour the landmark before we visited.

Last year, good friends stayed with us and they expressed an interest in touring the Frank Lloyd Wright studio as part of the evening tour; bingo!

Taliesin was established as Frank Lloyd Wright’s winter studio and school in 1937. During the summers, Wright would head to Taliesin in Spring Green, Wisconsin.

The Scottsdale, Arizona studio was built to blend in with the Sonoran Desert geography and to take advantage of its perch above Phoenix and the surrounding outskirts. It is an interesting and uniquely personal vision of one of America’s most famous architects.

To learn more about Frank Lloyd Wright and Taliesin and Taliesin West, visit the Taliesin Website.

Notes about Tours of Taliesin West

The Insights Tour is offered during the daytime starting daily at 9 AM. The Night Lights Tour is offered at 7 and 7:15 PM as of this posting. Please check the website or call for current information.

Websitehttp://franklloydwright.org/taliesin-west/tickets-tours/
Phone – 480.627.5375
Email info@franklloydwright.org

On July 2, 2017 when I checked the website, this notation appeared:

“This summer, we’re offering a 50% discount to all Arizona residents. This offer is only available through advanced booking and proof of residency must be shown when picking up tickets. Reserve now at the link below.”

As indicated in the introduction above, we selected the Night Lights tour.


The main reception area seen from the parking lot
As we arrived, the moon was rising. This is a photograph of the reception center as seen from the main parking area.

Umbrellas for visitors
Recent rains brought out umbrellas .

Frist stop was an introduction in a nearby meeting room
The tour group stopped at a nearby meeting room for a general introduction.

Read more about Taiesin West HERE.


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All content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross



Video – What Might Have Been – Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows

Just the other day a few of us were pondering some of the unknown. We were theorizing about how many times we might have met someone who was in relatively close proximity to us, but a connection was never made. Implied in this thread was the change in our lives that might have occurred had we actually met that certain individual. What impact might they have had on our lives?

A tangent to this line of thinking is how many close calls we might have had in life, but never knew because they never actually happened. Waiting an additional two seconds at a red light might have prevented us from being the victim of a reckless driver or perhaps getting on a subway a stop or two after someone with a disease coughed wildly and spread sickening germs might have spared us an illness. We will never know of course, but it is something to contemplate.

The video below from the Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows offers similar thoughts about this philosophical realm.

Moment of Tangency: A Glimpse of What Might Have Been

    If two lines are truly parallel,
    it means they’ll never actually meet.

Quoted from the YouTube video of The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows:

Making this episode was a joy, but naturally took forever to find shots that paired up. Sifting through hours of people’s Super8 and 16mm home videos was one of the sweetest wisftully painful pleasures I’ve ever had. If you ever get tired of what the world has come to, browse around on Vimeo for old movies like this. Even just the soft grainy color of the film stock will make your heart ache.

Golden Pavilion – Kyoto, Japan – (2015)

One of the major attractions that we looked forward to on our trip to Japan was a visit to Kyoto’s Golden Pavilion. The original strcuture (Kinkakuji), a Zen Buddhist temple, dates back to the 14th century, but unfortunately it was destroyed by arson. The temple was reconstructed and opened to the public in 1955. It is a beautiful, gold leaf-covered building oriented so the reflection in the surrounding water enhances its beauty.

Looking at the photo of the entrance below, one might think it was raining, but these were “sunbrellas” which proved very popular in Japan.


Golden Pavilion Entrance, Kyoto, Japan

Throughout our trip to Japan in 2015, I was taken in by the architectural elements that were so different from those found in other places I have visited. The very intricate designs incorporating contrasting and complementary materials were very creative as evidenced in this roof detail on a building at the Golden Pavilion compound.


Architectural roof detail, Kyoto, Japan

Here is yet another example


Architectural roof detail, Kyoto, Japan

Of course the main attraction was the Golden Pavilion itself…


Golden Pavilion - Kyoto, Japan


Golden Pavilion - Kyoto, Japan

which had some of its very own interesting roof detail in the form of a golden bird.


Golden bird roof detail, Golden Pavilion - Kyoto, Japan

There are, of course, other interesting things to see on the compound grounds. The photo below shows a coin toss venue where guests try to get the coins in the metal cup which they hope will bring them good luck. The symbolism of the statues was not clear, but one might intuit that they are religious in nature or at least cultural/spiritual.


Coin Toss at the Golden Pavilion Compound - Kyoto, Japan

The guide explained that the 500+ year old tree below was pruned to resemble a ship and if a bit of imagination is employed, one can imagine a large main sail and perhaps the bow of a ship pointing straight toward the viewer. If you look carefully, you might be able to see the wooden superstructure supporting the branches in the front.


Old tree pruned in shape of a ship. Golden Pavilion - Kyoto, Japan

Perhaps a clearer rendering can be seen HERE:

This mound (Hakuja-zuka) in Anmin-taku pond is home for a stone Pagoda.


Stone pagoda at the Golden Pavilion compound - Kyoto, Japan

Naturally a major tourist site such as the Golden Pavilion would have a souvenir stand to offer remembrances for sale. Pictured in pretty gold and red garb were visitors from Bali.


Souvenir stand at the Golden Pavilion Compound - Kyoto, Japan

We mustn’t overlook the religious and spiritual mission of the Golden Pavilion. Fudo Hall is an area where visitors can light incense, ring a bell and ask for blessings.


Fudo Hall, Golden Pavilion compound - Kyoto, Japan

The Golden Pavilion is one of those world renowned places that is hard to resist and as such, visitors (including me) seemed compelled to take large numbers of photographs.


One last photograph of the Golden Pavilion - Kyoto, Japan