Hiking: Brins Mesa – Sedona, AZ


along the Brins Mesa Trail - Sedona, AZ

Years ago we tried to hike the Brins Mesa trail with some visiting friends, but they weren’t hikers and soon decided that they weren’t prepared for the adventure so we returned to the car to visit other nearby and easily accessible vistas.

The Brins Mesa trail is probably best described as moderate to a bit more than moderate (at times). The trail is relatively well marked, but it is primarily uphill if you are starting from the main trailhead at the outskirts of town.

Soon after starting the climb, this is one of the scenes you will see.


along the Brins Mesa Trail - Sedona, AZ

One of the reasons for undertaking this hike is to admire the beautiful scenery and red rock vistas encountered along the entire trail.

There are what has been referred to as “natural stairs,” but the operative word there is natural. Creating steps from a rock face formed by nature is no easy task and as you might imagine, the spacing is not always ideal. Hiking sticks may be helpful for those who are less sure-footed.


along the Brins Mesa Trail - Sedona, AZ

In almost every direction, the red and sand-colored rocks rise above the trees to the wonder and appreciation of trailblazers.


along the Brins Mesa Trail - Sedona, AZ

You don’t see the mesa itself for a while, but persevere and you will come to a shelf-like geological feature that is the Brins Mesa (pictured below).


along the Brins Mesa Trail - Sedona, AZ

It is unfortunate that years ago there was a fire that destroyed many of the trees and the carcasses of those sentinels can be seen along the mesa’s trail.


along the Brins Mesa Trail - Sedona, AZ


along the Brins Mesa Trail - Sedona, AZ

For those who enjoy photography, there are numerous opportunities to capture memorable landscapes.


along the Brins Mesa Trail - Sedona, AZ

As we were hiking along the trail, we noticed what looked like a ledge (drop off) and a valley. We also spotted an outcropping or rather a small hill and we decided to explore. There is a trail leading in that general direction.


along the Brins Mesa Trail - Sedona, AZ

The picture below was taken while I was standing at the ledge. Notice the darker, reddish dirt in the valley.


along the Brins Mesa Trail - Sedona, AZ

I took a couple of panoramas (linked below) as the red rock mountains were spread out before me. It was too wide and too beautiful for me to capture in just one or two pictures. After some exploration and appreciatiion, we decided to return to the trailhead. Although it was mid-October, the day was quite warm and we had a long day. This is the scene looking back toward the ridge and surrounding mountains.


along the Brins Mesa Trail - Sedona, AZ

One rule of photography is to look behind you as you travel because sometimes, the best view is not in front, but in back. When returning along the same trail, this maxim becomes self-fulfilling. These are a few of the pretty formations we captured during the return to the trailhead.


along the Brins Mesa Trail - Sedona, AZ


along the Brins Mesa Trail - Sedona, AZ

Famous Bell Rock can be seen in the center of the photo below where the sky seems to meet the low-lying structure. It is hard to pick out, but look for the little nub on top.


along the Brins Mesa Trail - Sedona, AZ

Red rock spires and hoodoos (column of rock) are abundant.


along the Brins Mesa Trail - Sedona, AZ

Here are the two panoramas…


along the Brins Mesa Trail - Sedona, AZ

To see a larger photo of the scene, make your browser window larger and click HERE


along the Brins Mesa Trail - Sedona, AZ

To see a larger photo of the scene, make our browser window larger and click HERE

More information about the Brins Mesa trail can be found at the following links:

Brins Mesa Trail No. 119 – Forest Service (USDA)

Brins Mesa Trail – AZ Highways

 

Read more Hiking and Exploration posts HERE


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©Jeffrey B. Ross – 2017 – JBRish.com



Hiking the Peralta Trail, Gold Canyon, AZ – 20160625

NOTE – Keep in mind that we took this hike and these pictures represent the trail as we saw it in December, 2009. The trail may have changed a bit since them and some of the flora may no longer be exactly where we are reporting, but this is a good representation of things you may find along the way. Perhaps you will find even more intriguing highlights.

Of course the large rock formations and mountains will remain largely unchanged.


Approaching the saddle
A view from close to the saddle near the top of the Peralta Trail

As hikers continue to climb, it pays to look back “down” the trail. In some cases, hikers may find that the best views are behind them. This photo was taken as we began to approach the part of trail leading to the saddle, but looking back toward the trailhead.

Read more about the Peralta Trail HERE.

Previous posts and photographs in the Peralta Trail series in chronological order:


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JBRish.com originally published this post
*All photographs Copyright by Jeffrey B. Ross with all rights reserved.

Trail Ridge Road (RMNP) Marmots

The first marmot I saw, as far as I know, was at Yosemite National Park. I thought it was a beaver scampering across Tuolumne Meadows, but after doing some research and speaking with others, I came to the conclusion it was indeed a marmot. I had never heard of a marmot before that encounter.

“Yellow-bellied marmots (Marmota flaviventris) are one of the largest members of the squirrel family. They can be two feet in length and weigh up to 11 pounds. Their large body size is an adaptation to the cold, high elevation sites in which they live. Marmots have reddish-brown fur and a yellow belly, from which they get their name. They are related to woodchucks and groundhogs in other parts of the country.” (Via link below)

We recently visited Rocky Mountain National Park and they have their share of marmots as well. One day we drove along the Trail Ridge Road picking spots to get out and hike. It was bitter that day especially when considering we were coming from the N. Phoenix (100+ degree) area. The temperature was 34 degrees with serious wind gusts. Nevertheless, we braved the wind and cold to see beautiful vistas and whatever else we came across.

As I emerged from the car wearing a hiking shirt, hoodie, nylon rain jacket, lip balm, gloves and toting two cameras, I walked to the end of a paved path outpost and sunning themselves on the distant boulders to gather whatever heat they could were two marmots.

Marmots at Rocky Mountain National Park
Two marmots sunning themselves at Rocky Mountain National Park
Copyright by Jeffrey B. Ross – All RIghts Reserved”

Meta Data

File Name: 0580.CR2
Capture time: 8:46 AM
Capture date: Sep 15, 2016
Exposure: 1/400 sec @ f/7
Focal Length: 215mm
ISO 100
Canon SX50 HS

You can read more about marmots here – Rocky Mountain National Park (Service)

 

JBRish.com originally published this post

See previous JBRish posts and pictures about wildlife HERE