Picture Quote — 20170726

Today’s Picture Quote — 20170726

You make me understand how wonderful it is for little lizards when they find that one special rock that's perfect for sunning themselves on. You make me lizard-happy. - Randy K. Milholland
“You make me understand how wonderful it is for little lizards when they find that one special rock that’s perfect for sunning themselves on. You make me lizard-happy.” – Randy K. Milholland
Original Photograph Copyright by Jeffrey B. Ross – 2014 – 2017


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Photo Meta Data

File Name: IMG_2262.CR2
Capture time: 10:18:27 AM
Capture date: May 9, 2015
Exposure: 1/1250 @ f5.6
Focal Length: 89mm
ISO: 120
Canon Powershot SX50 HS
Location: Las Cruces, NM

*Edited: Lightroom with text added in Photoshop

 
See previous STATUS QUOtes HERE


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All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross – 2017


Lizard Tail on the Trail – Year of Yosemite (YOY) – Day 230

Lizard on the Taft Point Trail

Lizard along the Taft Point Trail

This was the second lizard of this type that we saw as we hiked along the Taft Point Trail. We passed one on the way to the point and this specimen showed up as we were on the way back to the parking area.

Interestingly enough, we saw both in the same area which was muddy from recent rains. As you can see, the shutter speed was a bit slow and the movement of his hind leg is blurred.

NOTE: In the YOY Day 38 post, we had a picture of a Sierra Fence Lizard taken during our Taft Point Trail hike and this appears to be the same species. This particular lizard looks as though he is regenerating a new tail which might have been torn off during an escape.

 
Do you have a question about our visit to Yosemite? Ask it in the comment section.

 

JBRish.com originally published this post
*All photographs Copyright by Jeffrey B. Ross with all rights reserved.

 
See previous Year of Yosemite (YOY) posts HERE. If you want to read the introduction to the YOY series, CLICK HERE.

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Meta Data – Day 230 YOY – Year of Yosemite

File Name: 0389.CR2
Capture time: 2:21:37 PM
Capture date: June 10, 2016
Exposure: 1/250 sec @ f/8.0
Focal Length: 108mm
ISO 125
Canon PowerShot SX50 HS

 

Year of Yosemite (YOY) – Day 128 (Another Small Gem – Lizard)

Yosemite blue bellied lizard

Another of my favorite subjects to photograph is lizards.

Yesterday I spoke of the small miracles we often overlook as we hike the byways of our parks and natural places by referring to plants, but we need to keep in mind that there are far more miracles than plants, flowers and trees.

The fellow above, probably a Western Fence Lizard, with beautiful markings including a blue belly and black collar is one of nature’s gems. Many lizards are able to shed their tails and then regenerate new appendages…truly a miracle. Look at the coloration. Isn’t that wonderful? This lizard blends well into the rock that it might be hard to see UNLESS you make the effort to look.

I so enjoy looking around as I hike and walk among our woods and fields. There is so much to see. What miracles of nature have you spotted that you feel many might have missed?

You can view a post about another lizard we came across along the Taft Point Trail by visiting Year of Yosemite – 38.

 
Do you have a question about our visit to Yosemite? Ask it in the comment section.

 

JBRish.com originally published this post
*All photographs Copyright by Jeffrey B. Ross with all rights reserved.

 
See previous Year of Yosemite (YOY) posts HERE. If you want to read the introduction to the YOY series, CLICK HERE.

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Meta Data – Day 128 YOY – Year of Yosemite

File Name: 0199.NEF
Capture time: 6:37:04 PM
Capture date: June 6, 2016
Exposure: 1/20 sec @ f/14
Focal Length: 35mm
ISO 100
Nikon D3300

Lizards and Snakes of Las Cruces, New Mexico

Those who have been reading my blog for a while realize that I have a strong personal connection to nature. I am interested in other living things as well as a few that are not quite alive such as rocks. If I had it to do all over again, I would collect rocks. I have a few, but not many. Let me not digress.

As we hike along, I collect (via photographs) a record of the various species of insects, reptiles, birds, plants, etc. that we encounter. Some are new to me and some are found in unanticipated circumstances.

In our spring trip to Las Cruces, NM we encountered several interesting lizards and one snake. By way of sharing my interest in photographing these animals and the joy in the abundance and variety of nature, I am including several pictures below.

Many thanks to the Arizona Herpetological Association – AHA for their warm hospitality and support in helping me identify these specimens. I recommend their website and organization to anyone who is interested in southwest herpitology.*

 
Lets start with a popular lizard of which we saw many…

The Chihuahuan Spotted Whiptail (Aspidoscelis exsanguis)

The Chihuahuan Spotted Whiptail (Aspidoscelis exsanguis)

This fellow was particularly interesting because of his “racing stripes” along his side. Adidas and Nike have nothing on him.

Greater Earless Male

Greater Earless Male (Holbrookia elegans)

This female appeared to be obviously pregnant.

Greater Earless Female

Greater Earless Female (Holbrookia elegans)

At quick glance, this looks like a pretty ho-hum specimen sitting on an ordinary rock, but…

Ornate Tree Lizard

Ornate Tree Lizard (Urosaurus ornatus)

Look at that turquoise-like coloring under his chin and belly!

Ornate Tree Lizard

Ornate Tree Lizard (Urosaurus ornatus)

And let’s not forget a fellow we included in his own post here,

Eastern Collared Lizard

Eastern Collared Lizard (Crotaphytus collaris)

The only snake we encountered was an adventurous, long and thin Patch-nosed Snake.

Patch-nosed Snake

Patch-nosed Snake (Salvadora hexalepis)

The markings on this specimen were quite nice; two colors of brown, one tan and one near chocolate in shade.

Patch-nosed Snake

Patch-nosed Snake (Salvadora hexalepis) – close up

 
*If I have misidentified any of the reptiles in this post, please let me know and I will make the appropriate corrections.

.JBRish.com originally published this post