Hiking: Yellow-Throated Gilia, Sequoia National Park, CA

One of the reasons I enjoy hiking is that it offers opportunities for interesting discoveries; some anticipated and others serendipitous. We were hiking along the Crescent Meadow Loop Trail in Sequoia National Park nearly a year ago when we came across a patch of wildflowers tucked away in a wooded area…


Yellow-Throated Gilia wildflower

It was hard to believe that these were real. The colors were so vibrant and unusual in combination. It was an amazing sight. The next day we were on the Sunset Point Trail and there was a large swath of these wildflowers covering the entire hillside.


Yellow-Throated Gilia wildflower
Love those standouts adding their all white accents in the middle of the patch!

 
Nature is the art of God.” – Dante Alighieri

Read more about Yellow-Throated Gilia HERE

 

Read more JBRish.com posts:

Hiking/Exploring HERE, Nature HERE, Photography HERE


**********

 


All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross – 2018 – JBRish.com



Adventures in Oregon: Cascade Head and Hart’s Cove in Lincoln City

We were anxious to travel to Lincoln City, OR as we had read so many intriguing reviews of the areas we chose for hiking. The Cascade Head Preserve seemed especially promising. It is a coastal headland with two trails one of which is much longer; 4.2 miles. The upper trail leads to the most scenic views and brings hikers to the top of the hills overlooking the ocean and nearby shore. This was really a no-brainer for us.

We opted for the shorter upper trail which was a relatively flat mile-long hike. We had been hiking for several days already and planned to continue hiking once we arrived at Crater Lake National Park so this seemed prudent.

It was difficult to find the correct forest road (Cascade Head Road 1861) which is more of a cut out along the highway than anything else. We persevered and finally wound up at the trailhead ready to go.

The first part of the hike looked like a pathway in Jurassic Park with the fungi and mosses covering the tree branches.


Jungle-like growth at the start of the trail
Jungle-like growth at the start of the trail

After hiking for a a bit more than twenty minutes, we reached the meadow viewpoints. The vista was stunning.


The meadow and ocean revealed themselves
The meadow and ocean revealed themselves

As we moved closer to the descending side of the hill, we could watch hikers arriving from the lower trail.


Hikers were arriving from the lower trail
Hikers were arriving from the lower trail

The contrast of the golden meadow, the green trees and shrubs against the blue ocean was a superb display of nature’s palette.


nature's colorful palette
A contrast of colors

The craggy rock outcroppings were also very dramatic.


Dramatic craggy outcroppings


Dramatic craggy outcroppings

I couldn’t resist taking a panorama from this expansive vantage point with such a remarkable view.


A panorama taken form the top of the meadow

Feeling self-satisfied, we decided to attempt the trek to Hart’s Cove and drove to that trailhead. We were somewhat daunted by the steepness of the trail heading down as we knew it would be uphill coming back. One rule of hiking when there is no loop is that for every down, there is an up!

We asked some ascending hikers what their thoughts were and after some encouragement, we began the descent. It was indeed downhill!

The first part of the hike takes trekkers through forests of hemlock and Sitka spruce. We then arrived at the open trail to the grassy meadow with anticipation of seeing the cove.


Finally, the path to the cove
Finally, the path to the cove

We were careful with our footing and made our way to an area where we could have lunch and enjoy the view of the cove.


A scenic backdrop
A scenic backdrop

Although we couldn’t see the sea lions, we could hear them barking in the distance.


A wonderful spot to enjoy lunch
A wonderful spot to enjoy lunch

We lingered for a time taking in the view and enjoying the best this area had to offer. Although we faced a strenuous (for us) return trip, the memories will remain long after our muscles have recovered.


A final view of the cove before we headed back
A final view of the cove before we headed back

For more information, you can refer to this web page: Cascade Head and Hart’s Cove


**********

Read previous posts about our adventures hiking and exploring in Oregon:

Exploring Astoria, Oregon – Part 1

Exploring Astoria, Oregon – Part 2

Exploring Astoria, Oregon – Part 3

Adventures in Oregon: Warrenton to Seaside

Adventures in Oregon: Hiking at Indian Beach

Adventures in Oregon: Views from Ecola Point

Adventures in Oregon: Movin’ On Down the Road

Adventures in Oregon: Garibaldi’s Graces and Pier

Adventures in Oregon: Tillamook – Cape Meares Lighthouse

Adventures in Oregon: Pacific City, Neskowin & Lincoln City

 

Read more Hiking and Exploration posts HERE


**********


All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross – 2018 – JBRish.com



Photography: My Shot – Canyonlands Wooden Shoe Arch

The southwest is truly a spectacular part of the United States. That is not to say other states, sections, etc. do not have beauiful areas as well, but the southwest has been blessed with an abundance natural wonders.

Utah, for example, has their Mighty Five:

  • Canyonlands National Park
  • Capitol Reef National Park
  • Arches National Park.
  • Bryce Canyon National Park
  • Zion National Park

I am glad to report that we have been to all of the above and we yearn to return to several of them to see more of what they have to offer. We hiked Zion two times and want to return at least once more. For those who love nature, hiking, etc. it is hard to overestimate the amount of wonder that can be found in all of the parks listed above.

As a side trip to visiting Arches National Park, we took a day to go to Canyonlands National Park’s Needles District. The day was stormy with periods of rain, but as long as it is safe, we hike rain or shine.

One site we saw was the Wooden Shoe Arch. I only had my 8 MP Canon point-and-shoot, but as they say: “The best camera is the one you have with you.” I took the picture below and I think it captures the beauty of the area.


Stormy Canyonlands Wooden Shoe Arch

You may have to look carefully to see the “shoe.” It is the formation in the distance on the right. The heel and front of the shoe are separated by a space. The cloudy day makes it hard to discern so I put an arrow above the shoe in the picture below.


Stormy Canyonlands Wooden Shoe Arch

**********

Metadata

File Name: 8968_cl_woodenshoe_arch.JPG
Capture time: 3:02:01 PM
Capture date: September 11, 2012
Exposure: 1/200 sec @ f/5.5
Focal Length: 23.2mm
ISO: 200
Camera: Canon PowerShot AS590 IS
Lens: 4.3-215mm

Edited in Lightroom

**********

Read more photography posts HERE


**********

 


All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross – 2017 – JBRish.com



Vide-Ohs: Dust in the Blood (Hiking the Grand Canyon)

JBRish readers know that one thing we enjoy and write about on this blog is hiking and exploring natural places. We appreciate all forms of wildlife and types of terrain, but the mountains and canyons have a special pull on our adventurous spirit.

The Grand Canyon is indeed one of earth’s treasures and it is a shame that mankind has tried to take advantage of its bounty by harvesting natural resources and obliterating some of the pristine beauty.

Below is just one photograph I took on our visit to the North Rim. It was taken with a very simple point-and-shoot camera with only 8 megapixels of resolution when most of today’s cameras start at twice that number and many go to three or four times that and beyond.


North rim of the Grand Canyon near the Lodge

Even with the limited ability of the camera and the photographer, I think you will agree that this is a pretty, colorful picture taken near “the Lodge” at the north rim of the Grand Canyon.

I am also sharing the trailer to the movie Dust in the Blood detailing the journey of filmmaker/photographer Pete McBride and writer Kevin Fedark as they try to hike the 750 mile length of the Grand Canyon.

Dust in the Blood – Trailer from Pete McBride on Vimeo.

From the Vimeo web page hosting the trailer:

In 2016 filmmaker/photographer Pete McBride and writer Kevin Fedarko set out on a 750-mile journey on foot through the entire length of the Grand Canyon. From the outset, the challenge was far more than they bargained for. More people have stood on the moon than have completed a continuous through hike of the Canyon. McBride and Fedarko took a sectional approach, achieving a feat that many adventurers have taken decades to complete. Others have lost their lives trying. But their quest was more than just an endurance test – it was also a way to draw attention to the unprecedented threats facing one of our most revered landscapes.

Throughout their passage, McBride and Fedarko encountered an astonishingly diverse and powerful landscape, rich in history, that is now facing perhaps the gravest crisis in the 98-year history of the Grand Canyon National Park.

Directed by Pete McBride and produced by the award-winning team at Insignia Films, THE CANYON is a story of extreme physical hardship that stretches the bonds of friendship and a meditation on the timeless beauty of this sacred place. It is an urgent warning about the environmental dangers that are placing one of America’s greatest monuments in peril and a cautionary tale for our complex relationship with the natural world.

 

More Vide – Ohs

To See additional Interesting Videos, click HERE


**********


All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross – 2018 – JBRish.com



Photography – My Shot: Enchanted Forest, Tillamook, OR


Enchanting patch of forest

A beautiful scene along the South Trail of Cape Lookout near Tillamook, OR

The majesty of the forest has always had a special place in my heart. I feel a kinship with the plants and trees which are so vital to our ecosystem and therefore our lives. The picture above was taken during our hike along the South Trail of Cape Lookout which is part of Cape Lookout State Park near Tillamook, OR.

As you can tell, the mist was clearing, but still hanging in the air. This tree had an intricate web of roots which enhanced its character even if it made footing a bit tricky. I was taken in by the wonderful colors of brown and greens. This was an enchanted setting.

 

**********

Metadata

File Name: DSC_2002.NEF
Capture time: 9:12:35 AM
Capture date: September 9 2017
Exposure: 1/60 sec @ f/13
Focal Length: 25mm
ISO: 720
Camera: Nikon D3300
Lens: 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6mm

Edited in Lightroom

**********

Read more photography posts HERE


**********

 


All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross – 2018 – JBRish.com



Photography: As Shot – Stormy Mendocino Headlands


Stormy Ocean - Mendocino Headlands

There is something about a stormy sea that attracts me. Knowing that I am standing on terra firma looking at the churning water and feeling the building strength of the impending storm carries a thrill with it. On such a day we were drawn to the edge of the ocean in Mendocino Headlands State Park. There were only a few adventurers at the water’s edge this morning.

The grey skies could not hide the beauty of the scene. The browns of the beach and rocks against the bluish grey water and sky created a very pleasing panorama.

Read more about Mendocino Headlands State Park – Click HERE

**********

Metadata

File Name: IMG_1636.CR2
Capture time: 9:51:17 AM
Capture date: September 24, 2014
Exposure: 1/250 sec @ f/4.0
Focal Length: 4.3mm
ISO: 100
Camera: Canon PowerShot SX50 HS
Lens: 4.3-215mm

Edited in Lightroom

**********

Read more photography posts HERE


**********

 


All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross – 2017 – JBRish.com



Adventures in Oregon: Tillamook – Cape Meares Lighthouse


Cape Meares Sign

I knew little about Tillamook, OR except that it was a dairy town and I only knew that because our grocery stores have Tillamook cheeses and ice cream. The town of Tillamook itself wasn’t a major stop on our itinerary, but served more as a jump off point for the hiking areas relatively nearby.

Our first adventure outside of Tillamook was to the Cape Meares Lighthouse.

As you can see in the picture below, there is a clear path from the parking lot to the lighthouse area. It was a dreary day, but the seaside’s dramatic ambience was enticing. Ocean storms can be dramatic!


The top of the Tillamook Lighthouse
The top of the Tillamook Lighthouse seen from the walking path

I hadn’t appreciated the fact that lighthouses have lights with different color patterns. The red and clear glass created a “signal” to let captains know that this is Cape Meares. Not only are there different color patterns, but the duration that each color is visible is very precise.


Color glass pattern of the lighthouse lens
Clear and Red glass create the signal that this is Cape Meares

Before taking the lighthouse tour, we walked to the edge of the visiting area to capture a few stormy photographs of the picturesque rock formations and the choppy waters of the Pacific.


The rocky coastline was stormy this day
The rocky coastline was stormy this day

Here’s a closer view…


A closer view of the rock formations offshore

The lighouse was near the edge of the cliff overlooking the ocean and therefore did not have to be too tall for the sake of visibility.


Tillamook Lighthouse is located on the edge of a cliff
The roofline to the right helps point to the short stature of the lighthouse

From the inside, visitors can appreciate the lens arrangement and all of the mechanisms required to operate and maintain a lighthouse


Colorful glass seen inside the lighthouse
The colorful glass seen against the dark metal provide visual appeal

The polished gears gave evidence to the excellent condition of this lighthouse and the machinery needed to operate the turret.


Gears used to rotate the light
Gears used to rotate the turret

This picture gives a good representation of the size of the main tower of the lighthouse.


A picture of the vertical portion of the lighthouse
The vertical portion of the lighthouse

The tour was very interesting and the docent was very knowledgeable about lighthouses in general and of the Cape Meares structure specifically.

There were a few more stops we could have made in the park, but the weather was not conducive so we decided to head back to town. On the return path, we came across a very large Banana Slug (Ariolimax columbianus). I placed a quarter next to it to help viewers understand the size of this animal; impressive for a slug.


A very large Banana Slug (Ariolimax columbianus)
A very large Banana Slug (Ariolimax columbianus)

One last look back at the coastline before the trip back to Tillamook.


The coastline near the lighthouse


**********

Read previous posts about our adventures hiking and exploring in Oregon:

Exploring Astoria, Oregon – Part 1

Exploring Astoria, Oregon – Part 2

Exploring Astoria, Oregon – Part 3

Adventures in Oregon: Warrenton to Seaside

Adventures in Oregon: Hiking at Indian Beach

Adventures in Oregon: Views from Ecola Point

Adventures in Oregon: Movin’ On Down the Road

Adventures in Oregon: Garibaldi’s Graces and Pier

 

Read more Hiking and Exploration posts HERE


**********


All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross – 2017 – JBRish.com



Cape Meares, lighthouse, ocean, pacific, beach, scenery, history, landscape, pacific ocean

Photography: As Shot – Storm Brewing – Hereford, AZ

NOTE – “As Shot” photographs are some that I have posted on Instagram, but without any imposed crop, less detail reduction and more of an explanation.


On the road near Hereford, Arizona with storm clouds closing in

On the road near Hereford, Arizona with storm clouds closing in.

We were on a bird watching and hiking trip to southern Arizona near Hereford and Sierra Vista, when we were returning from hiking in Coronado National Memorial. Storm clouds began to close in on the area creating a dramatic scene.

Read more about Coronado National Memorial

**********

Metadata

File Name: 2369_sierra_vista_20150709
Capture time: 2:50:18 PM
Capture date: July 9, 2015
Exposure: 1/800 sec @ f/5.6
Focal Length: 5.33mm
ISO: 100
Camera: Canon PowerShot SX50 HS
Lens: 4.3-215mm
Edited in Lightroom

**********

Read more photography posts HERE


**********

 


All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross – 2017 – JBRish.com



Photography: As Shot – The Mittens

NOTE – “As Shot” photographs are some that I have posted on Instagram, but without any imposed crop, less detail reduction and more of an explanation.


East and West Mittens at Monument Valley, Arizona

East and West Mittens at Monument Valley as storm begins to roll in

Several years ago we visited Monument Valley. The only camera I had with me was a simple 8MP Canon PowerShot AS590 IS, but I think I was still able to acquire several fine photographs to document our visit.

The picture above is of two structures referred to as “mittens.” a name derived from the fact that they look like two giant mittens when viewed from certain angles.

**********

Metadata

File Name: 8834_mv_mittens
Capture time: 3:04:22 PM
Capture date: September 10, 2012
Exposure: 1/640 sec @ f/5.6
Focal Length: 9.9mm
ISO: 80
Camera: Canon PowerShot AS590 IS
Lens: 5.8-23.2mm
Edited in Lightroom

**********

Read more photography posts HERE


**********

 


All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross – 2017 – JBRish.com



Landscape Photography More or Less?

Readers of JBRish know that I enjoy hiking and photography. If the truth be told, I enjoy photography more. Interestingly, however, when I put the two together, they have a beautiful synergy that gives me great satisfaction. Taking photographs also helps to keep the memories alive.

I found Thomas Heaton’s video (below) engaging. It contains worthy messages and photographs. On his blog, he uses this quote:

“We are not content with a nice view. We need the best view.”

This is very true. MOST landscape or scenery photographers do want the “best view.” I have come to realize that at my age, having captured a nice view or perhaps a very good view, might be good enough for me.

Most landscape photographers strive for the golden hours near sunrise and sunset and I agree that generally is the best light for landscapes, but can’t those vistas have a beauty of their own under different lighting conditions? I think they can.

After you watch the video, Wake Up. There’s More to Landscape Photography (below), I want to refer you to one of Heaton’s blog posts:

Yosemite Valley – I am People in which he decries the crush of the crowd at Yosemite, but then moves on to exclaim the wonder of it all.

When we visited Yosemite last June, which is the basis for my Year of Yosemite project, we found it extremely busy. It was so busy that even though we stayed in the Valley and paid for a nice room near the Lodge, we were NOT GUARANTEED a parking space.

It felt a bit like a Seinfeld episode. They can take the reservation for the room and you probably need a car to get there, but there may not be a parking spot. When I lived in NYC as a child, my parents would have to think really hard before we moved the car and relinquished our parking spot. I have come full circle more than fifty years later; but I digress…

If you liked any of my photographs of Yosemite, Thomas Heaton has captured much more of the majesty than I could manage and I think you will really like his work!

 

JBRish.com originally published this post

See previous Photography posts HERE