Photography: As Shot – Storm Brewing – Hereford, AZ

NOTE – “As Shot” photographs are some that I have posted on Instagram, but without any imposed crop, less detail reduction and more of an explanation.


On the road near Hereford, Arizona with storm clouds closing in

On the road near Hereford, Arizona with storm clouds closing in.

We were on a bird watching and hiking trip to southern Arizona near Hereford and Sierra Vista, when we were returning from hiking in Coronado National Memorial. Storm clouds began to close in on the area creating a dramatic scene.

Read more about Coronado National Memorial

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Metadata

File Name: 2369_sierra_vista_20150709
Capture time: 2:50:18 PM
Capture date: July 9, 2015
Exposure: 1/800 sec @ f/5.6
Focal Length: 5.33mm
ISO: 100
Camera: Canon PowerShot SX50 HS
Lens: 4.3-215mm
Edited in Lightroom

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All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross – 2017 – JBRish.com



Photography: As Shot – The Mittens

NOTE – “As Shot” photographs are some that I have posted on Instagram, but without any imposed crop, less detail reduction and more of an explanation.


East and West Mittens at Monument Valley, Arizona

East and West Mittens at Monument Valley as storm begins to roll in

Several years ago we visited Monument Valley. The only camera I had with me was a simple 8MP Canon PowerShot AS590 IS, but I think I was still able to acquire several fine photographs to document our visit.

The picture above is of two structures referred to as “mittens.” a name derived from the fact that they look like two giant mittens when viewed from certain angles.

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Metadata

File Name: 8834_mv_mittens
Capture time: 3:04:22 PM
Capture date: September 10, 2012
Exposure: 1/640 sec @ f/5.6
Focal Length: 9.9mm
ISO: 80
Camera: Canon PowerShot AS590 IS
Lens: 5.8-23.2mm
Edited in Lightroom

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Read more photography posts HERE


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All original content on this blog is copyrighted by Jeffrey B. Ross with ALL Rights Reserved. While reference links back to JBRish.com are appreciated and encouraged, please acquire approval for any reproduction of original content from this website.

©Jeffrey B. Ross – 2017 – JBRish.com



Landscape Photography More or Less?

Readers of JBRish know that I enjoy hiking and photography. If the truth be told, I enjoy photography more. Interestingly, however, when I put the two together, they have a beautiful synergy that gives me great satisfaction. Taking photographs also helps to keep the memories alive.

I found Thomas Heaton’s video (below) engaging. It contains worthy messages and photographs. On his blog, he uses this quote:

“We are not content with a nice view. We need the best view.”

This is very true. MOST landscape or scenery photographers do want the “best view.” I have come to realize that at my age, having captured a nice view or perhaps a very good view, might be good enough for me.

Most landscape photographers strive for the golden hours near sunrise and sunset and I agree that generally is the best light for landscapes, but can’t those vistas have a beauty of their own under different lighting conditions? I think they can.

After you watch the video, Wake Up. There’s More to Landscape Photography (below), I want to refer you to one of Heaton’s blog posts:

Yosemite Valley – I am People in which he decries the crush of the crowd at Yosemite, but then moves on to exclaim the wonder of it all.

When we visited Yosemite last June, which is the basis for my Year of Yosemite project, we found it extremely busy. It was so busy that even though we stayed in the Valley and paid for a nice room near the Lodge, we were NOT GUARANTEED a parking space.

It felt a bit like a Seinfeld episode. They can take the reservation for the room and you probably need a car to get there, but there may not be a parking spot. When I lived in NYC as a child, my parents would have to think really hard before we moved the car and relinquished our parking spot. I have come full circle more than fifty years later; but I digress…

If you liked any of my photographs of Yosemite, Thomas Heaton has captured much more of the majesty than I could manage and I think you will really like his work!

 

JBRish.com originally published this post

See previous Photography posts HERE

A New Zealand Passion for Photography

Mike Langford and Jackie Ranken, two professional photographers from New Zealand, share the reasons why they are so passionate about photography and why they find it so rewarding.

Mike Langford + Jackie Ranken from Untitled Film Works on Vimeo.

Below is the synopsis from the Vimeo page:

A look into the world and minds of award-winning photographers – Mike Langford and Jackie Ranken.

Shot in 4K amongst the breath-taking landscapes of the South Island of New Zealand.

Mike Langford: “I believe landscape photography is about a sense of place”

Mike’s passion is travel & landscape photography and travel book publishing with over 26 books to his name. “I believe landscape photography is about a sense of place, not just about what it looks like, but more about what it feels like.”

Jackie Ranken: “The on-going pursuit in finding new ways of seeing and exploring the landscape. My expertise as a landscape photographer began in 2001 with a series of images called “Arial Abstracts’. Black and white images made while upside down in a loop from my father’s antique bi-plane.”

Yikes! Spikes – Agave and Sotol

This spring/summer has been an unusual one for our desert garden especially our front landscape. We have a good number of agaves in our front yard. Agaves are sharp-leaved plants that need little water so they do very well in arid places and the Sonoran desert is no exception.

Once in their lifetime agaves send out a flower stalk which we refer to as a spike. The spike flowers and then produces bulbils (plantlets) or seeds. Once the process is complete, the mother plant dies. Before the plant dies, however, it generally produces other plants which are called pups.

We moved into our home and several agaves were already in place and then we added additional species. Each agave species or type flowers according to their own timetable and if you were planting a bunch of agaves from the same species, you would want to purchase them at different stages of growth so they don’t all spike at once and end up dying at the same time.

Here is what our landscape looks like now…

Agaves with spikes

Can you see all the spikes? Just in case you can’t see them all, here they are numbered…

Agaves with spikes numbered

Yes we have seven spikes all at the same time. As I indicated above, these are not all the same type of agave and it just worked out that they spiked together.

We have one additional twist to the story. Among the agaves is a sotol (Dasylirion wheeleri) , or desert spoon (#4). They also send out a spike. One of the main differences is that the sotols don’t die after producing their spike. They continue with their life cycle. You can see that it looks quite different from the others. While we have at least three sotols, only one has sent out a spike this season.

Here is a close up of the one section and the sotol is a bit more noticeable (right of center).

sotol among the agaves

We found this random occurrence unusual and it makes our landscape look a bit otherworldly with all those spikes in the air. What are your thoughts?

 
Read More:

Agaves

Arizona Municipal Water Users Association/a> – Click on a variety to see more detail

Here is a picture of a variegated agave ( Agave weberi ‘Arizona Star’) which adds an additional interest to the landscape

Sotol (desert spoon)

Arizona State University

Water When Dry